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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The private spaceflight industry isn't just interested in being the manufacturing and infrastructure workhorse in space — some want in on exploration.

Why it matters: Studying planets from close range has long been the realm of governments able to fund and fly missions to distant locations like the Moon, Mars and Venus. Now, private companies are shooting for those destinations and they're prioritizing science at the same time.

What's happening: Rocket Lab, a small rocket manufacturer, is developing a private mission to Venus in conjunction with scientists in the hopes of finding out if life actually exists on the nearby world.

  • The company's CEO, Peter Beck, says he hopes the mission will be the first in a number of low-cost missions that could fly frequently and iterate on the science.
  • Virgin Orbit, another small rocket launch company, has also looked at partnering to launch small interplanetary missions for nations and others.
  • NASA has plans to bring private companies into its efforts to explore and maybe eventually mine the Moon, creating new possible pathways for planetary science in the process.

The big picture: Planetary missions today cost hundreds of millions of dollars, but with private companies getting in on the action, that price could go down significantly in the coming years.

  • And those cheap missions could give scientists a window into worlds — like Venus — that haven't been studied as closely as many would like.
  • Much of the interest around possible private interplanetary missions was sparked when NASA launched the small, relatively inexpensive MarCO satellites to Mars, proving that even little spacecraft could have high scientific return on distant missions.

Between the lines: Even private individuals could fund their own planetary missions soon.

  • "We have talked to non-government folks who are interested in planetary missions," Virgin Orbit's Will Pomerantz told me, adding that these individuals have the funds available to develop and launch them.
  • For his part, Beck sees Rocket Lab's mission to Venus as a "human duty" to help advance understanding of whether we're alone in the universe.
  • "If you have the ability to go and, at least in your lifetime, to answer a question like that, to just sit there and not do it is inexcusable from my perspective," Beck told me.

But, but, but: Philanthropy isn't a great business model, even for private companies hoping to advance humanity's exploration of the solar system.

  • "I think the challenge for overall commercial exploration is figuring out who the customers are beyond NASA," Elizabeth Frank, an applied planetary scientist at First Mode, a company focused on helping companies and governments solve problems in space and on Earth, told me.
  • Private planetary science missions also aren't beholden to the scientific priorities of the broader community, Frank added, meaning that, unless there's some type of oversight, they may answer questions that no one is really asking.
  • That kind of model could also raise questions similar to philanthropic funding of particular diseases or projects that may not speak as fully to the broader needs of the scientific community.

The bottom line: Private companies could transform the way scientists understand planets and moons throughout the solar system with small missions and small rockets that can answer big scientific questions.

Go deeper

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
Jan 28, 2021 - Science

Seven distant, rocky planets may be made of the same material

Artist's illustration of the seven planets of TRAPPIST-1 and the Earth. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The densities of seven potentially rocky planets orbiting a star 40 light-years away are surprisingly similar, according to a new study.

Why it matters: The finding is unusual because the planets in our solar system have different densities. Scientists can use the new data to home in on whether these planets, that appear similar in some ways to our own but form differently, might be suitable for life.

Minnesota governor denounces alleged police violence against media

Law enforcement officers pepper spray freelance photographer Tim Evans (L) as he identifies himself a working journalist outside the Brooklyn Center police station on Friday. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Gov. Tim Walz (D) spoke out Sunday over allegations that journalists covering unrest in the Twin Cities suburb of Brooklyn Center have endured police violence, telling CBS Minnesota: "Apologies are not enough, it just cannot happen."

Why it matters: Since violations of press freedoms came to national attention last year, with reports of journalists being arrested and assaulted while covering anti-racism protests, violent encounters with law enforcement seem to have become the norm.

7 hours ago - World

In photos: Students evacuated as wildfire burns historic Cape Town buildings

Firefighters try, in vain, to extinguish a fire in the Jagger Library, at the University of Cape Town, after a forest fire came down the foothills of Table Mountain in Cape Town, South Africa, on Sunday. Photo: Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images

A massive wildfire spread from the foothills of Table Mountain to the University of Cape Town Sunday, burning historic South African buildings and forcing the evacuation of 4,000 students, per Times Live.

The big picture: Visitors to the Table Mountain National Park and other nearby attractions were also evacuated and several roads including a major highway, were closed. South Africa's oldest working windmill and the university's Jagger Library, which houses SA antiquities, were among the buildings damaged.