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Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March on in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur /AFP via Getty Images

Thousands rallied in cities across the U.S. on Saturday in a Women's March meant "to send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to [President] Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat."

Driving the news: Many attending Saturday's marches — from Washington, D.C., to Mobile, Alabama and Boise, Idaho held signs depicting the late Supreme Court justice, who, before dying last month, reportedly told her granddaughter that her "most fervent wish" was that she would "not be replaced until a new president is installed."

The bottom line: Many attending the Women's March, the latest of several protests that started with a massive demonstration the day after Trump's 2017 inauguration, urged people to get out and vote.

  • “[Trump's] presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period,” Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March said on Saturday, per AP.
Nikki Cole, national policy campaign director of One Fair Wage, rallies at the base of an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essential, representing service worker’s demand for respect, full pay and fair elections, at the Women's March in a Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images for One Fair Wage)
Many in New York City held signs encouraging people to vote in November. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Many protesters held signs depicting Ginsburg and her words during Saturday's Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Marchers in Washington, D.C., pose with an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essential. Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images for One Fair Wage
Demonstrators took to the streets in honor of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and to protest President Donald Trump's nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court before the November election. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
A women holds a sign that says, "smash with patriarchy," at the Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators march past the Supreme Court in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C.. Some supporters of Trump and Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett also rallied on Saturday. Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper

Oct 28, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court won't expedite Pennsylvania GOP's request to block mail-in ballot extension

Amy Coney Barrett being sworn in by Chief Justice John Roberts. Photo: Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via Getty Images

The Supreme Court voted 5-3 on Wednesday to deny a bid from Pennsylvania Republicans to expedite their request to shorten the deadline for receiving mail-in ballots. Newly confirmed Justice Amy Coney Barrett did not participate in the decision.

Why it matters: A lower court ruling allowing ballots to be counted until 5pm on Nov. 6, as long as they are postmarked by Election Day, will remain in place for now.

Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note ±3.3% margin of error for the total sample size; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

About half of Americans are worried that trick-or-treating will spread coronavirus in their communities, according to this week's installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: This may seem like more evidence that the pandemic is curbing our nation's cherished pastimes. But a closer look reveals something more nuanced about Americans' increased acceptance for risk around activities in which they want to participate.

Updated 9 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.