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Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March on in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur /AFP via Getty Images

Thousands rallied in cities across the U.S. on Saturday in a Women's March meant "to send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to [President] Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat."

Driving the news: Many attending Saturday's marches — from Washington, D.C., to Mobile, Alabama and Boise, Idaho held signs depicting the late Supreme Court justice, who, before dying last month, reportedly told her granddaughter that her "most fervent wish" was that she would "not be replaced until a new president is installed."

The bottom line: Many attending the Women's March, the latest of several protests that started with a massive demonstration the day after Trump's 2017 inauguration, urged people to get out and vote.

  • “[Trump's] presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period,” Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March said on Saturday, per AP.
Nikki Cole, national policy campaign director of One Fair Wage, rallies at the base of an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essential, representing service worker’s demand for respect, full pay and fair elections, at the Women's March in a Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images for One Fair Wage)
Many in New York City held signs encouraging people to vote in November. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Many protesters held signs depicting Ginsburg and her words during Saturday's Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Marchers in Washington, D.C., pose with an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essential. Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images for One Fair Wage
Demonstrators took to the streets in honor of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and to protest President Donald Trump's nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court before the November election. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
A women holds a sign that says, "smash with patriarchy," at the Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators march past the Supreme Court in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C.. Some supporters of Trump and Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett also rallied on Saturday. Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper

Supreme Court sides with Trump administration on abortion pill rule

Capitol Police stand guard at the Supreme Court Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Photo:y Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Supreme Court granted a Trump administration appeal on Tuesday and reinstated a federal requirement obligating women seeking an abortion pill to obtain the drug from a hospital or medical center in person.

Why it matters: It's the court's first ruling on abortion since the arrival of the conservative Trump-appointed Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

Tech scrambles to derail inauguration threats

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Tech companies are sharing more information with law enforcement in a frantic effort to prevent violence around the inauguration, after the government was caught flat-footed by the Capitol siege.

Between the lines: Tech knows it will be held accountable for any further violence that turns out to have been planned online if it doesn't act to stop it.

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Uganda's election: Museveni declared winner, Wine claims fraud

Wine rejected the official results of the election. Photo: Sumy Sadruni/AFP via Getty

Yoweri Museveni was declared the winner of a sixth presidential term on Saturday, with official results giving him 59% to 35% for Bobi Wine, the singer-turned-opposition leader.

Why it matters: This announcement was predictable, as the election was neither free nor fair and Museveni had no intention of surrendering power after 35 years. But Wine — who posed a strong challenged to Museveni, particularly in urban areas, and was beaten and arrested during the campaign — has said he will present evidence of fraud. The big question is whether he will mobilize mass resistance in the streets.