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Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Scott Olson/Getty Images

Pete Buttigieg released Tuesday his plan to reduce prescription drug prices, which includes many of the liberal proposals that have become the new Democratic normal.

Between the lines: This plan puts Buttigieg somewhere in the leftward middle of the top-tier candidates on drug prices. The field — and the party as a whole — is much more aggressive on the subject than Democrats have been in the past.

How it works: Many of Buttigieg's proposals mirror those included in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's drug pricing plan.

  • Like Pelosi, Buttigieg would allow the federal government to negotiate drug prices for Medicare and then make those negotiated prices available to private insurers.
  • Drug companies would be severely penalized if they don't negotiate.
  • He would base the negotiations on international prices, the therapeutic gain offered by the drug, the cost of bringing it to market, and the cost of treating the condition it addresses.

Yes, but: Buttigieg goes further than House Democrats, although other 2020 candidates have endorsed similar policies.

  • Most notably, he would allow the federal government to revoke the intellectual property rights of drug companies who have refused to negotiate or are still abusively pricing.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren is still most liberal on the subject, as she'd allow the government to manufacture some generics.

  • While Buttigieg recently told AARP that he "potentially" supports the approach, it's not included in yesterday's white paper.

Go deeper: How Democrats want to limit drug prices

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.