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Two dogs going for a walk outside the Animal Rescue of New Orleans on March 24. Photo: Chris Graythen/Getty Images

Animal shelters and rescue organizations across the United States say their kennels are empty, as Americans take advantage of days spent at home during the coronavirus outbreak by adopting pets.

Why it matters: With fewer animals in their kennels, shelters don't have to resort to euthanasia to make room for new litters or strays.

The big picture: Matt Bershadker, president and CEO of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, told NBC News that the organization has seen a 70% jump in animals entering foster homes in its New York City and Los Angeles programs compared to last year.

  • Vice President at the Pasadena Humane Society Jack Hagerman told the Los Angeles Times that his shelter has seen a “massive uptick” in interest for pet adoption, adding that 1,451 people asked to foster animals after the organization sent its first plea for volunteers.
  • Animal Care Centers of New York City told the New York Times that 2,000 people applied for the 200 empty slots in its foster program.
  • In Florida, Friends of Palm Beach County Animal Care and Control reported empty kennels for the first time in the shelter's history, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

Yes, but: Many shelters are also bracing for increases in owner surrenders or stray intakes as the virus infects and kills more people and harms the economy.

  • "We don’t know what will happen as the numbers of sick and deceased increases, nor do we know what impact the financial stresses might have," Jim Tedford, president and CEO of the Association for Animal Welfare Advancement, told USA Today. "But for now we’ve seen communities step up and help reduce shelter populations rather than the other way around."

Go deeper: The environmental impact of Fluffy and Rover

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
30 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Higher education expands its climate push

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

New or expanded climate initiatives are popping up at several universities, a sign of the topic's rising prominence and recognition of the threats and opportunities it creates.

Why it matters: Climate and clean energy initiatives at colleges and universities are nothing new, but it shows expanded an campus focus as the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent, and the world is nowhere near the steep emissions cuts that scientists say are needed to hold future warming in check.

Ina Fried, author of Login
57 mins ago - Economy & Business

The pandemic isn't slowing tech

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Thursday's deluge of Big Tech earnings reports showed one thing pretty clearly: COVID-19 may be bad in all sorts of ways, but it's not slowing down the largest tech companies. If anything, it's helping some companies, like Amazon and Apple.

Yes, but: With the pandemic once again worsening in the U.S. and Europe, it's not clear how long the tech industry's winning streak can last.

Texas early voting surpasses 2016's total turnout

Early voting in Austin earlier this month. Photo: Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Texas' early and mail-in voting totals for the 2020 election have surpassed the state's total voter turnout in 2016, with 9,009,850 ballots already cast compared to 8,969,226 in the last presidential cycle.

Why it matters: The state's 38 Electoral College votes are in play — and could deliver a knockout blow for Joe Biden over President Trump — despite the fact that it hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976.