Sep 26, 2017

People really don't like pop-up ads, pre-roll

Data: Morning Consult, August 24-September 8, 2017. Note: Excludes 'Don't know/No Opinion'; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

New research from Morning Consult finds that pop-up ads and pre-roll ads are the least favored by consumers. Per the study, younger viewers are willing to pay more on average to avoid invasive ads. Adults aged 34 and younger would pay about $35 to eliminate ads on social media.

  • The backlash against digital advertising has created an uptick in ad-blocking: More than a quarter of internet users in the United States use ad blockers, and that number has been steadily increasing year over year, according to estimates by eMarketer.
  • Millennials, males, streamers, researchers and heavy downloaders are most likely to use an ad blocker, according to the latest Dimension study from Kantar Media, a leading advertising measurement company.
  • Both Google and Apple are rolling new ad-blocking technologies within their search engines to better user experience.

Go deeper

2020 rules of the road for the Age of Misinformation

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With just weeks to the Iowa caucuses, social media platforms have finalized their rules governing political speech — and fired a starting pistol for political strategists to find ways to exploit them from now till Election Day.

Why it matters: "One opportunity that has arisen from all these changes is how people are trying to get around them," says Keegan Goudiss, director of digital advertising for Bernie Sanders' 2016 campaign and now a partner at the progressive digital firm Revolution Messaging.

Facebook won't stop letting politicians lie in ads

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Anyone who was waiting for Facebook to change its controversial political ad policies — particularly the one that allows politicians to lie with impunity — will have to keep waiting, the company made clear Thursday.

Driving the news: Facebook released a raft of small changes to its rules around political ads, including giving consumers the option to block political ads from their feeds.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020

Facebook will make political ads optional for users

Photo: Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Facebook said Thursday it will give consumers the option to stop seeing political ads in their feeds moving forward.

Why it matters: Facebook has been heavily criticized for its policies around political ads, especially for its decision not to fact-check political ads.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020