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Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence indicated his support Saturday for a group of Republican senators planning to object to certifying state Electoral College votes on Jan. 6.

Details: Pence's chief of staff Marc Short issued a statement to news outlets that the vice president "shares" concerns on voter fraud, though he did not cite any specific evidence.

  • "The vice president welcomes the efforts of members of the House and Senate to use the authority they have under the law to raise objections and bring forward evidence before the Congress and the American people" Wednesday, when Congress is due to certify the Electoral College vote, per the statement.

The big picture: The senators, led by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), have also called for resurrecting an Electoral Commission to conduct an emergency audit of the results.

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) had hoped to avoid such a political spectacle for his party, with the move having no bearing on President-elect Joe Biden's win and upcoming inauguration.
  • Every U.S. state has certified the 2020 election results following extensive verification processes. The Supreme Court and several judges across the country have "rejected nearly 60" election results challenges by President Trump and his allies, the New York Times notes.

Go deeper: Barr: DOJ has seen no evidence of fraud that would change election results

Go deeper

Most Senate Republicans join Rand Paul effort to dismiss Trump's 2nd impeachment trial

Photo: Joshua Roberts-Pool/Getty Images

Forty-five Senate Republicans, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, supported an effort to dismiss former President Trump's second impeachment trial.

Why it matters: The vote serves as a precursor to how senators will approach next month's impeachment trial, making it highly unlikely the Senate will vote to convict. The House impeached Trump for a second time for "incitement of insurrection" following events from Jan 6. when a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol.

Jan 26, 2021 - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

McConnell defends filibuster: "You don’t destroy the Senate for fleeting advantage"

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) on Tuesday condemned Democratic support for abolishing the legislative filibuster, arguing that it would create a "scorched-earth Senate."

Why it matters: Many Democrats are pushing to use their newfound majority to eliminate the 60-vote threshold needed for major legislation, which would make it easier to pass progressive priorities. Resistance from Republicans and moderate Democratic Sens. Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.) and Joe Manchin (W.V.) has made that unlikely.