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Speaker Nancy Pelos in the House of Representatives on Jan. 13. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) announced on Wednesday that the House is moving forward with a new rule to impose fines on members for refusing to pass through metal detectors before entering the chamber.

Why it matters: The rule change comes after several House Republicans became frustrated with the detectors and bypassed them Tuesday night, according to CNN and NBC News.

What they're saying: “On behalf of the House, I express my deepest gratitude to the U.S. Capitol Police for the valor that they showed during the deadly insurrection on the Capitol, as they protected the lives of the staff and the Congress," Pelosi said.

  • “Sadly, just days later, many House Republicans have disrespected our heroes by verbally abusing them and refusing to adhere to basic precautions keeping members of our Congressional community, including the Capitol Police, safe."

The big picture: Members who refused to pass through the detectors will face a $5,000 fine for a first offense and $10,000 fine for a second — both of which will be deducted from offending representative's pay.

  • Freshman Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-Colo.), who has inquired about carrying firearms into the U.S. Capitol, got into an altercation with Capitol Police on Tuesday and initially refused to show officers the contents of her bag, though she was eventually allowed into the chamber, according to CNN.

Go deeper

Jan 17, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Republicans ignore McCarthy and name-drop anyway

Rep. Liz Cheney speaks as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy watches. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc via Getty Images

Members of the House Republican Conference ignored leader Kevin McCarthy last week when he warned them against criticizing colleagues by name based on intelligence that doing so could trigger more political violence.

Why it matters: McCarthy made clear that name-dropping opponents, instead of spelling out complaints in more general terms, can put a literal target on a politician, especially with tensions so high following the events of Jan. 6.

Ina Fried, author of Login
59 mins ago - Technology

Scoop: Google is investigating the actions of another top AI ethicist

Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Photo by Mateusz Wlodarczyk/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Google is investigating recent actions by Margaret Mitchell, who helps lead the company's ethical AI team, Axios has confirmed.

Why it matters: The probe follows the forced exit of Timnit Gebru, a prominent researcher also on the AI ethics team at Google whose ouster ignited a firestorm among Google employees.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Scoop: Joe Biden's COVID-19 bubble

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The incoming administration is planning extraordinary steps to protect its most prized commodity, Joe Biden, including requiring daily employee COVID tests and N95 masks at all times, according to new guidance sent to some incoming employees Tuesday.

Why it matters: The president-elect is 78 years old and therefore a high risk for the virus and its worst effects, despite having received the vaccine. While President Trump's team was nonchalant about COVID protocols — leading to several super-spreader episodes — the new rules will apply to all White House aides in "high proximity to principals."