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U.S. Capitol Police installing a metal detector outside the doors of the House of Representatives on Jan. 12. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Members of the House of Representatives must now pass through metal detectors before entering the chamber, according to a memo from acting House Sergeant at Arms Timothy Blodgett.

Why it matters: Previously, members were able to enter the chamber without any security screening. The unprecedented measures comes less than a week after the violent assault on the Capitol building by a pro-Trump mob and as some GOP House freshmen have inquired about carrying guns into the Capitol.

  • The memo also reiterated that members are only allowed to have guns in their personal offices. If they try to bring a "prohibited item" to the floor, they will not be allowed to enter the chamber.
  • Members may also be denied entry or removed from the chamber if they fail to wear a mask on the House floor.
  • Some Republicans have been refusing to wear masks. Several members of Congress have tested positive for COVID since having to be in lockdown with those who would not wear masks.

The big picture: House Democrats are pursuing a resolution that would impose fines on members who fail to follow the mask mandate, a senior House Democratic aide tells Axios' Kadia Goba.

  • If approved, members would face a $500 fine for a first offense, and a $2,500 fine for a second office — both of which would be deducted from their pay. A similar fine system is being considered for the entire House side of the Capitol and House office buildings.

Go deeper

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
13 mins ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.