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Pay-TV paralyzes consumers with options

As more television becomes digital, the push to provide consumers with customized content discovery will only intensify. At least half of consumers (55%) look for a new content to watch at least once per week, and 83% look for it a few times per month, per PwC's new content discovery report.

Reproduced from a PwC content discovery report; Chart: Axios Visuals
  • Content discovery is an integral part of the consumer experience: Nearly two-thirds (62%) of consumers agree that they often struggle to find something to watch, despite there being many choices available to them. Consumers say it's much harder to find something to watch than read or listen to.
  • If after only a few minutes a consumer can't figure out what to put on, PwC finds that one in every five people will resort to rewatching something they've already seen.

PWC's data also suggests that content has a longer shelf life among consumers who rely exclusively on streaming. "Pay-TV subscribers favor shows released recently, while non-pay-TV streamers choose shows dispersed across several months or even years," according to the report.

  • Why it matters: "Utilization of metadata and machine learning along with AI are crucial to maximizing returns on all of this investment in content," sys Greg Boyer, US Media & Entertainment Sector Advisory Leader at PwC. "User retention should grow as a recommendation becomes more intelligent and search function becomes more refined."
Axios 1 hour ago
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Mnuchin defends Trump's views on trade with China at IMF meeting

US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin holds a press conference during the IMF/World Bank spring meeting.
Steve Mnuchin holds a press conference during the IMF/World Bank spring meeting. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The International Monetary Fund believes that the world economy could grow 3.9% over "this year and next," the AP reports, which "would be the fastest since 2011."

But, but, but: The IMF's policymaking committee said "a strong world economy is threatened by increasing tension over trade and a heavy global debt load." Per the AP, the trade war between China and the U.S. could "drag down worldwide growth." Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin argued in favor of the administration, saying what drags down the global economy is "unfair global trade practices."