Dec 20, 2018

Trump tells GOP leaders he won't sign short-term spending bill

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) said Thursday outside of the White House that President Trump informed House Republican leaders that he would not sign a short-term spending bill passed by the Senate "because of legitimate concerns about border security."

What's next: Ryan said the House would attempt to pass a bill with funding for Trump's border wall. It's unclear if the bill will garner enough support, suggesting the government may be heading for a partial shutdown Friday at midnight.

The big picture: The border wall is one of Trump's signature campaign promises, and with Democrats taking control of the House in January, this is likely his last chance to get funding for a border wall. Last week, Trump told Democratic leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi in a heated Oval Office exchange that he would be "proud to shut down the government for border security."

Statement from Press Secretary Sarah Sanders:

"President Trump just met with Republican Members of the House. Not surprisingly, they all feel strongly about Border Security — stopping the flow of drugs, stopping human trafficking, and stopping terrorism. We protect nations all over the world, but Democrats are unwilling to protect our nation. We urgently need funding for border security and that includes a wall."

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Timeline: The India-Pakistan conflict over Kashmir

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The deadly protests during President Trump's visit to India between Muslims and Hindus flared over a new citizenship law, which critics say is anti-Muslim, are the latest clash between adherents of the two religions.

The big picture: Predominantly Hindu India officially removed special privileges in August for its only Muslim-majority state, Jammu and Kashmir region, exacerbating tensions with Pakistan. The dispute over Jammu and Kashmir, which lies between India and Pakistan and is partially controlled by both countries, dates back seven decades. It has sparked three wars and sporadic threats of nuclear conflict. India is now attempting to change the status of Jammu and Kashmir, prompting Pakistan to warn of “impending genocide.”

TimelineArrow3 mins ago - World

Coronavirus spreads to new countries, while U.S. confirms 57 cases

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

Public health officials confirmed Tuesday the U.S. has 57 people with the novel coronavirus, mostly those repatriated from the Diamond Princess cruise ship — an increase they had expected after the passengers were allowed to return home from Japan against their initial advice.

The big picture: COVID-19 has killed more than 2,700 people and infected more than 80,000 others, mostly in mainland China. There's only been two cases of person-to-person infections in the U.S. so far, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now warning that Americans should prepare for a much broader outbreak here.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health