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Paul Manafort. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia argued in a court filing Monday that the Washington Post's request to release sealed and redacted records related to Paul Manafort's case should be rejected because of the existence of several "ongoing investigations."

"The redactions at issue were undertaken and approved recently — from December 2018, through March 2019. No material changes have occurred in these past months. Although the Special Counsel has concluded his work, he has also referred a number of matters to other offices. The ongoing investigations that required redactions — many of which were already being conducted by other offices — remain ongoing."

The big picture: A redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report is expected to be released on Thursday morning. But even with Mueller technically concluding his 2-year probe last month, it's become clear that his team has farmed out many of the investigative threads they uncovered to other offices.

  • Just last week, former Obama White House counsel Gregory Craig was indicted in D.C.'s district court for making false statements in an investigation stemming from Mueller's probe.
  • Lobbyist Sam Patten was also sentenced in D.C. last week after he pleaded guilty to helping steer Ukrainian money into Trump's inaugural committee.

Among the other confirmed cases that began with Mueller and have been picked up by other offices:

  • The Wall Street Journal reported last week that the Southern District of New York has interviewed members of Trump's inner circle in its investigation of hush money payments, which remains ongoing even after Michael Cohen's sentencing.
  • Longtime Trump adviser Roger Stone is expected to go on trial in November after being indicted for allegedly lying about his communications with the Trump campaign about WikiLeaks.
  • Former Trump campaign deputy chairman Rick Gates has had his sentencing delayed 5 times as he continues to cooperate with prosecutors in "several ongoing investigations."
  • Former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn also had his sentencing delayed, as he is expected to testify in a Virginia case involving his former lobbying partner later this summer.

The bottom line: Former federal prosecutor Gene Rossi tells Politico: "The Mueller report was just the first step. What these recent events show me is that Robert Mueller has created an army of acolytes and those soldiers are now embedded in the Justice Department, Eastern District of Virginia, Southern District of New York and Washington D.C. These acolytes are trained, they’re hungry and they’re determined."

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Updated 2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Our make-believe economy is here to stay

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Federal Reserve and global central banks are remaking the world's economy in an effort to save it, but have created something of a monster.

Why it matters: The Fed-driven economy relies on the creation of trillions of dollars — literally out of thin air — that are used to purchase bonds and push money into a pandemic-ravaged economy that has long been dependent on free cash and is only growing more addicted.

Mike Allen, author of AM
4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Why Trump may still fire Barr

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Attorney General Barr may be fired or resign, as President Trump seethes about Barr's statement this week that no widespread voter fraud has been found.

Behind the scenes: A source familiar with the president's thinking tells Axios that Trump remains frustrated with what he sees as the lack of a vigorous investigation into his election conspiracy theories.

Mike Allen, author of AM
4 hours ago - World

Scoop: Trump's spy chief plans dire China warning

Xi Jinping reviews troops during a military parade in Beijing last year. Photo: Thomas Peter/Reuters

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe on Thursday will publicly warn that China's threat to the U.S. is a defining issue of our time, a senior administration official tells Axios.

Why it matters: It's exceedingly rare for the head of the U.S. intelligence community to make public accusations about a rival power.