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Data: SimilarWeb; Chart: Axios Visuals

There has been a big uptick in traffic to conservative social media networks like Parler, thedonald.win and Gab over the past few months, according to data from SimilarWeb.

Why it matters: Conservatives are looking to build their own social media platforms, where they can escape from what they feel is baseless censorship of their viewpoints from mainstream social media networks.

The big picture: While some of these apps are experiencing big traffic growth, they still pale in comparison to the size of companies like Facebook, where conservative publishers like Ben Shapiro still have deep-rooted networks and loyal followings.

As of last week, nearly all of the major social media platforms have taken action on accounts belonging to President Trump, his supporters and the alt-right.

  • Those actions prompted calls by conservative lawmakers to ditch traditional social media for new platforms like Parler.
  • As a result, parler.com's average daily traffic skyrocketed by 741.5% in just four days from June 24-28.

By the numbers: Since its start in 2018, parler.com has had several periods of peaking traffic, with a notable peak occurring in June of 2019, when it was reported that there were nearly 200,000 new users, many from Saudi Arabia, who were leaving Twitter because of its censorship policies.

  • However, the most notable peak was this past June, when visits to the site were 2.834M, up 518.5% from May.

Go deeper

Hunter Biden story trips social media misinformation alarms

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

In 2016, hacked emails and foreign meddling shaped the political fight, and social media took much of the blame. Afterwards, the platforms designed circuit breakers to avoid a repeat in 2020.

What's happening: Those breakers tripped Wednesday at both Facebook and Twitter to stop the spread of a New York Post story that reported allegations about Joe Biden's son Hunter, based on what the paper said were emails provided to it Sunday by Rudy Giuliani.

DOJ watchdog to probe whether officials sought to alter election results

Former President Donald Trump and former First Lady Melania Trump exit Air Force One in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Jan. 20. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department's inspector general will investigate whether any current or former DOJ officials "engaged in an improper attempt to have DOJ seek to alter the outcome" of the 2020 election, the agency announced Monday.

Driving the news: The investigation comes in the wake of a New York Times report that alleged that Jeffrey Clark, the head of DOJ's civil division, had plotted with President Trump to oust acting Attorney General Jeffery Rosen in a scheme to overturn the election results in Georgia.

1 hour ago - Podcasts

Google's chief health officer Karen DeSalvo on vaccinating America

Google on Monday became the latest Big Tech company to get involved with COVID-19 vaccinations. Not just by doing things like incorporating vaccination sites into its maps, but by helping to turn some of its offices and parking lots into vaccination sites.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into what Google is doing, and why now, with Dr. Karen DeSalvo, Google's chief health officer who previously worked at HHS and as health commissioner for New Orleans.

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