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Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Apple on Friday morning demanded that Parler, a social media app favored by conservatives and far-right extremists, submit a “moderation improvement plan” within 24 hours or face removal from the app store, BuzzFeed reports.

Driving the news: In a letter to Parler executives, Apple said it had received several complaints that the app had been used to help plan and facilitate Wednesday's deadly siege on the Capitol by supporters of President Trump.

The big picture: Parler serves as a hub for people suspended from popular social networks like Twitter and Facebook.

  • It’s branded as a free speech alternative and practices looser moderation, allowing posts that include conspiracy theories, threats and hate speech, among other things, to remain on the platform.

What they’re saying: Parler “appears to continue to be used to plan and facilitate further illegal and dangerous activities," Apple wrote in its letter to Parler, per BuzzFeed.

  • "Content of this dangerous and harmful nature is not appropriate for the App Store,” it added.
  • “Content that threatens the well being of others or is intended to incite violence or other lawless acts has never been acceptable on the App Store.”
  • Apple did not immediately respond to Axios' request for comment.

Parler CEO John Matze wrote on Friday that the company would "not cave to pressure from anti-competitive actors!"

  • "We will and always have enforced our rules against violence and illegal activity,” Matze added.

Google announced later on Friday it has pulled Parler from its app store for not taking stronger action to remove posts that seek "to incite ongoing violence" in the U.S.

Go deeper: Twitter bans Trump

Editor's note: This story has been updated with Google's announcement.

Go deeper

Facebook takes new steps to deter inauguration week violence

Photo: by Valera Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Facebook on Friday said it would block the creation of new events near the U.S. Capitol and state capitol buildings as it tries to prevent violence in the week of the inauguration.

Why it matters: Facebook and other tech companies are scrambling to stop their platforms from being used to plan or carry out violence following the storming of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

24 hours ago - Politics & Policy

House panels reviewing what intel agencies knew before deadly Capitol siege

A man calls on people to raid the building as Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images.

The House Intelligence, Oversight, Judiciary and Homeland Security committees have opened a review of the events and intelligence surrounding the deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol and other threats to the peaceful transfer of power, the panels said in a letter to federal intelligence agencies Saturday.

Why it matters: Law enforcement and intelligence agencies have faced sharp criticism for not being better prepared for the Capitol riot, despite reports that far-right Trump supporters discussed the idea of a violent protest on social media and chat platforms in the weeks leading up to the Jan. 6 event.

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden readies massive shifts in policy for his first days in office.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.
  6. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.