Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Waiting, in New Delhi. Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

While the 95% efficacy rates for the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines are great news for the U.S. and Europe, Monday's announcement from Oxford and AstraZeneca may be far more significant for the rest of the world.

Why it matters: Oxford and AstraZeneca plan to distribute their vaccine at cost (around $3-4 per dose), and have already committed to providing over 1 billion doses to the developing world. The price tags are higher for the Pfizer ($20) and Moderna ($32-37) vaccines.

Details: The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine had an average efficacy of 70% in clinical trials, though that rose to 90% under one dosing regimen (patients received a half dose, and then a full dose one month later).

  • While that fell short of numbers reported by Moderna and Pfizer, it's well above the 50% efficacy threshold set by the FDA.

The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine can also be stored at standard refrigeration levels for six months.

  • Moderna's vaccine can be kept under standard refrigeration for 30 days but otherwise must be stored at -20°C
  • Pfizer's must be stored at -70°C, a requirement that few developing countries are equipped to handle.

By the numbers: AstraZeneca has already promised 940 million doses to developing countries and another 300 million to the COVAX initiative, according to Duke University's tracker.

  • Moderna is also a participant in the COVAX initiative, through which wealthier countries will subsidize access for poorer ones.
  • But Moderna's chief medical officer told Axios last week that when it came to COVAX, the company hadn't "quite aligned with them on how many doses and when those doses would be available."
  • Pfizer is not a participant in COVAX.
Data: Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance; Map: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Breaking it down: Pfizer has sold a minimum of 614 million doses to high-income countries and just a combined 14 million in bilateral deals with lower-income countries (Ecuador, Lebanon and Peru), according to Duke's tracker.

  • If rich countries exercise their options to buy more of the Pfizer vaccine, they could swallow up nearly all of the 1.3 billion doses the company aims to produce in 2021.
  • Moderna has also been selling almost exclusively to rich countries.
  • In addition to the 1.24 billion for developing countries, AstraZeneca has sold 1.17 billion doses to rich countries (the U.S., EU, U.K., Japan, Australia and Canada).

The flipside: AstraZeneca will manufacture its vaccine in multiple countries, including India and Brazil, and aims to produce a total of 100 million to 200 million doses per month by the spring.

  • Both India (500 million doses) and Brazil (100 million) have secured their access to the vaccine, as have countries including Indonesia (1oo million), Bangladesh (30 million), Egypt (30 million) and Argentina (22 million), according to the Duke tracker.

What to watch: While countries like Canada, the U.S. and the U.K. have hedged their bets by buying enough doses of multiple vaccine candidates to cover their populations several times over, less wealthy countries are cutting deals wherever they can.

  • At least 11 countries plan to obtain Russia's vaccine candidate, Sputnik V. The government says the vaccine is 92% effective and has given it partial approval, but has made only limited data available.
  • China has also promised several countries access to its vaccine candidates, several of which are in late-stage trials.

Go deeper: Key information about the effective COVID-19 vaccines

Go deeper

Jan 26, 2021 - Health

U.K. surpasses 100,000 COVID-19 deaths

Photo: Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images

The U.K. on Tuesday surpassed 100,000 coronavirus deaths almost a year after the first two cases were reported in the country, according to government figures.

Why it matters: It is the first European country and fifth country in the world to reach the threshold. The country reported 100,162 deaths on Tuesday.

Scammers have stolen over $130 million in coronavirus-related schemes

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Over 100,000 Americans have collectively reported roughly $132 million in fraud losses from scams related to the coronavirus and government stimulus checks since the March start of the pandemic, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

Why it matters: Coronavirus-related fraud complaints peaked in May when the IRS began sending its first round of stimulus checks. Congress recently proposed a second round of stimulus.