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Reproduced from Morning Consult; Note: Gen Z survey margin of error ±3%, adults and millennials ±2%; Chart: Axios Visuals

Endless articles have examined how young sports fans consume content. But here's the real question we ought to be asking: What content do they consume?

Driving the news: Young sports fans don't follow sports the way their parents did. And that change in fandom gets more extreme with each generation.

Background: The sports media model is built on live sports rights. Networks pay billions of dollars to broadcast games, and everything flows from that.

The state of play: Gen Zers are about half as likely as millennials to watch sports often, and twice as likely to never watch, per a recent Morning Consult survey.

  • This is largely because 47% of them don't consider themselves fans. But even those who do follow sports are doing so in entirely new ways.
  • They watch highlights, not games; they follow athletes, not teams; they're just as interested in an Instagram story as they are in last night's box score.
Girls basketball players at Overtime's "The Takeover" event. Photo: Overtime

What they're saying: "Sports fandom is so much more broad and malleable now," says Dan Porter, CEO of Overtime, which made a name for itself through viral high school clips and has since become a "Gen Z sports oasis," per WSJ.

  • What was once viewed as "shoulder content" to support primetime programming (i.e., a behind-the-scenes look at an athlete's life) is now the content that young sports fans engage with the most.
  • And since it's still so undervalued, companies like Overtime, which has 45 million followers across its social channels and produces a variety of sports and sports-adjacent content, have been able to leverage it.

The big picture: Legacy media companies have tried to model Overtime's approach to reach young fans. But Porter says they often misunderstand what Overtime, and social media more broadly, is about: two-way engagement.

  • "These companies are like, 'Oh, Overtime is high school basketball, so let's put some high school basketball shows on TV.' What they miss is that we respond to over 250,000 direct Instagram messages a year."
  • "We have five people who do nothing but go into the comment sections and engage with our followers," says Porter, a former WME executive.
Overtime host, Overtime Larry, takes a video with fans. Photo: Overtime

The bottom line: 30 years ago, a kid growing up in Dallas was a Mavericks fan and watched SportsCenter to catch up on the latest news and highlights. When NFL Sunday arrived, he watched the Cowboys on the living room TV.

  • Nowadays, a kid growing up in Dallas is still a Mavericks fan, but he's likely an even bigger fan of Luka Dončić, who he follows on Instagram (and who has almost 3x as many followers as the Mavs).
  • He gets his news from social media, so there's no need for SportsCenter. When NFL Sunday arrives, he streams NFL RedZone, while watching his favorite player's latest YouTube vlog on his phone.

Go deeper: The Brooklyn startup helping high school athletes go viral (New Yorker)

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Dec 21, 2020 - Economy & Business

Scoop: FuboTV considering exclusive sports content deals

Upstart streaming network fuboTV "should be looking at" forming exclusive partnership deals for live sports offerings, CEO David Gandler tells me.

Why it matters: The company is small but growing fast — its stock price has jumped 340% year to date, including a 19% gain on Thursday and 11% gain on Friday that pushed its fully diluted market cap to more than $5.7 billion, per FactSet — and could pull sports-dedicated streaming companies like DAZN and ESPN+ toward further content siloing.

Updated 7 hours ago - World

Biden in call with Netanyahu raises concerns about civilian casualties in Gaza

Photo: Ahmad Gharabli/Nicholas Kamm/Getty Images

President Biden spoke to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Saturday and raised concerns about civilian casualties in Gaza and the bombing of the building that housed AP and other media offices, according to Israeli officials.

The big picture: At least 140 Palestinians, including dozens of children, have been killed in Gaza since fighting between Israel and Hamas began Monday, according to Palestinian health officials. Nine people, including two children, have been killed by Hamas rockets in Israel.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

"Horrified": AP, Al Jazeera condemn Israel's bombing of their offices in Gaza

A ball of fire erupts from the Jalaa Tower as it is destroyed in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza. Photo: Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Associated Press and Al Jazeera on Saturday condemned the Israeli airstrike that destroyed a high-rise building in Gaza that housed their and other media offices.

What they're saying: The White House, meanwhile, said it had "communicated directly to the Israelis that ensuring the safety and security of journalists and independent media is a paramount responsibility," according to press secretary Jen Psaki.