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Evan Vucci / AP

A clear pattern has emerged when President Trump does something highly controversial or deeply offensive to large chunks of America. Within 24 hours, a story is leaked about how Ivanka and Jared are disappointed or tried to stop it.

Why it matters: Jared and Ivanka provided some hope for some on the left who hoped the duo would have power to dissuade President Trump from some of his most extreme promises. But the truth is, they only have so much influence. Roll the tape:

Charlottesville: While on vacation, Ivanka and Jared tried and failed to temper Trump's final response to the Charlottesville rally, according to the New York Times.

Paris Agreement: After organizing weeks of meetings with climate and energy leaders and pushing for her father to keep the U.S. in the Paris Accord, President Trump left the agreement anyway.

Transgender military ban: Ivanka and Jared were "shocked" by the President's tweets a couple of weeks ago banning transgender individuals from serving in the military, according to the Daily Beast. The couple had previously managed to stop a draft of an executive order overturning policies protecting LGBTQ rights in the workplace.

Mexico meeting: In February, after Jared Kushner successfully arranged a meeting between Donald Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, Trump tweeted, "If Mexico is unwilling to pay for the badly needed wall, then it would be better to cancel the upcoming meeting." Sources told Vanity Fair that Kushner was "f***ing furious."

Muslim ban: Soon after being elected, President Trump signed an executive order banning travelers from 7 majority-Muslim countries — while Jared and Ivanka were away from work and technology, observing Shabbat. Sources told Vanity Fair that Ivanka felt terrible about posting a photo of herself and Jared and sporting fancy evening wear during the wide-spread travel ban protests that weekend. While Ivanka never decried the ban, she has expressed sympathy for Syrian refugees, calling the issue a "global humanitarian crisis" needing to be resolved.

Apologizing: Even before he was elected, Ivanka begged her father to make a "full-throated" apology in the wake of the Access Hollywood tapes scandal, but her father did not want to listen, according to NYT.

Go deeper

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.