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Reproduced from Patreon; Chart: Axios Visuals

From barbers to pastors to fitness instructors, any person that used to make money via brick and mortar services, is now turning to online platforms to make money for their expertise.

Why it matters: A slew of old-line industries that once hesitated to embrace digital technologies are now being forced to do so for the sake of survival.

Driving the news: Patreon says that 30,000+ creators signed up for its service in the first three weeks of March. That's paired with a surge in people willing to pay.

  • The average growth of new people signing up to pay people for content across the U.S., UK, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Italy is up 36.2% in March compared to February.

The big picture: Other creative platforms are seeing a major uptick in sign-ups. TikTok has reportedly seen a surge in U.S. downloads in response to the crisis.

  • Be smart: Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, told NBC News' Dylan Byers last week that he's seeing an increased interest in "moments," like live music performances via Instagram or churches that "go live on Facebook."

What's next: Once consumers get used to accessing services digitally, these services may find it hard to go back to completely go back traditional operations.

Go deeper: Coronavirus pushes traditional businesses into the digital age

Go deeper

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
2 hours ago - Podcasts

Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck

President Biden has said that getting Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 is his administration’s top priority given an initial rollout plagued by organizational, logistical and technical glitches.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the bottlenecks and how to unclog them with Carbon Health chief executive Eren Bali, whose company recently began helping to manage vaccinations in Los Angeles.