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Photo: John Paraskevas/Newsday RM/Getty Images

In cities and states with sharp spikes in novel coronavirus cases, officials are restricting testing to health care workers and those who have been hospitalized — signaling a new phase in the pandemic response, The Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: The advisory shows the spread of COVID-19 is overwhelming parts of the American health care system, the Post writes. The U.S. isn't familiar with making trade-offs between the "individual and societal good," given its wealth and advanced health care system.

  • While, a test result may be reassuring for some individuals with mild symptoms, the resources used to perform the test could be redirected to possibly save another life.

What they're saying: The new messaging indicates that more people can get tested, but those with mild symptoms should avoid doing so and practice social distancing.

  • The other side: Health experts' warnings come as the Trump administration announces millions of test kits and drive-through sites are becoming more widely available.

The state of play: Cases of COVID-19 are spiking in California, New York, Washington state and other U.S. communities. Health officials are focused on conserving masks, ventilators and hospital beds.

  • Los Angeles County health officials recommended on Thursday that physicians avoid testing patients as a containment strategy. They instead suggested patients should be tested only if a positive result could change their treatment plan.
    • The department “is shifting from a strategy of case containment to slowing disease transmission and averting excess morbidity and mortality,” the Post writes citing a letter from LA County health officials
  • Sacramento officials have ordered residents to stay home except for essential activities.
  • Washington state medical workers have resorted to using makeshift protective gear from Home Depot and craft stores. Officials are limiting testing to health care workers, individuals with severe symptoms and those at a high risk.

The bottom line: "As the flu season recedes, people with cough and fever will increasingly just have to presume they have covid19," the Post writes.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
19 mins ago - Economy & Business

Ripple CEO calls for clearer crypto regulations following SEC lawsuit

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse tells "Axios on HBO" that if his company loses a lawsuit brought by the SEC, it would put the U.S. cryptocurrency industry at a competitive disadvantage.

Why it matters: Garlinghouse's comments may seem self-serving, but his call for clearer crypto rules is consistent with longstanding entreaties from other industry players.

Republican Sen. Roy Blunt will not seek re-election in 2022

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), widely seen as a member of the Republican establishment in Congress, will not run for re-election in 2022, he announced on Twitter Monday.

Why it matters: The 71-year-old senator is the No. 4-ranking Republican in the Senate, and the fifth GOP senator to announce he will not run for re-election in 2022 as the party faces questions about its post-Trump future.

1 hour ago - Health

Popular independent COVID tracker officially ends daily updates

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The COVID Tracking Project, a volunteer group of data analysts, researchers, and journalists brought together by The Atlantic, published its final daily update on Monday — the one-year anniversary of its founding.

Why it matters: The project quickly became a vital resource for news media, academic researchers, and everyday Americans to track COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths in the absence of reliable and public data from the federal government.