Former President Obama says "the way we structure democracy requires you to take into account people who don’t agree with you." Photo: Timothy Hiatt/Getty Images

Former President Obama said Saturday he's concerned about progressives who are unwilling to compromise because it risks weakening "the overall effort and movement."

What he's saying: "One of the things I do worry about sometimes among progressives in the United States ... is a certain kind of rigidity where we say, 'Uh, I'm sorry, this is how it's going to be,' and then we start sometimes creating what's called a circular firing squad, where you start shooting at your allies because one of them is straying from purity on the issues," said at an Obama Foundation town hall event in Berlin, Germany.

The big picture: Obama's comments come at a time where Democrats are shifting to the left on big ideas such as Medicare for All, spearheaded by 2020 hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). Freshman Democrats like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) have garnered national attention with progressive policies such as the Green New Deal.

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There's little consensus on TikTok's specific national security threat

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

TikTok has become a Rorschach test for how U.S. politicians view China, with little consensus on the specifics of its threat to homeland security.

The big picture: Much of what D.C. fears about TikTok is fear itself, and that's reflected in President Trump's executive order to ban the app by Sept. 20 if it's not sold by parent company ByteDance — alongside another focused on Chinese messaging app WeChat and its parent company Tencent.

U.S. sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam

Photo: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)

The Treasury Department on Friday placed sanctions on Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, following months of tension as she has allowed continued overreach by Beijing to subvert Hong Kong's autonomy.

Why it matters: It's the toughest sanction yet imposed on China for its destruction of Hong Kong’s relatively free political system.

GM's high-stakes electric move

The Cadillac Lyriq. Image courtesy of Cadillac

Cadillac on Thursday unveiled the Lyriq, the luxury brand's first all-electric model and GM's first consumer electric vehicle unveil since the Chevy Bolt several years ago.

Why it matters: It's the first reveal by GM of an electric vehicle that will use the company's new modular platform and Ultium battery system — technologies meant to underpin the 20 electric vehicles that GM plans to launch by 2023.