Photo: Alexandra Schuler/picture alliance via Getty Images

The New York Police Department will disband its anti-crime unit, which consists of hundreds of plainclothes officers that target violent crime, commissioner Dermot Shea announced at a news conference Monday.

The big picture: The unit, which consists of some 600 officers, "was involved in some of the city’s most notorious police shootings," according to the New York Times. Officers in the unit will be given new assignments, including in the NYPD's neighborhood policing initiative.

What they're saying: "This is a seismic shift in the culture of how the NYPD polices this great city," Shea said at a press conference. "This is 21st-century policing. We must do it in a manner that builds trust between the officers and the community they serve.”

  • “What we always struggle with, I believe, as police executives, is not keeping crime down. It’s keeping crime down and keeping the community with us and I think those two things, at times, have been at odds."

Go deeper: The major police reforms that have been enacted since George Floyd's death

Go deeper

Updated Jun 19, 2020 - Axios Events

Watch: A conversation to commemorate Juneteenth

On Friday, June 19, Axios' markets reporter Dion Rabouin hosted a discussion on the history of Juneteenth and the current nationwide protests against police violence, featuring former Obama advisor Valerie Jarrett, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, BET founder Robert Johnson and activist DeRay Mckesson.

Robert Johnson discussed the history of Juneteenth and his advocacy around reparations.

  • On reparations and race relations: "Reparations is a demand on the part of African-Americans that we be made whole for the wealth that was stolen from slaves over a 300 year period...My position is that white America should recognize the debt and black Americans should be proud to accept the atonement."
  • How slavery laid the foundation for racial income inequality: "It is no secret that the net income of a white family is $170,000 on average. The net income of a black family is $17,000. That 10-fold disparity can be traced directly back to the wealth transfer that started with slave labor."

Mayor Sylvester Turner focused on policy decisions around policing in Houston, and responded to calls for defunding the police.

  • On his decision to increase police funding: "We need policing. [People] are asking for good policing. They're asking for a policing system that's accountable. They're also going beyond that...They want to be investing in communities and neighborhoods that have been overlooked and under invested in for decades."

Valerie Jarrett discussed the ongoing demonstrations around the country and the upcoming election in November.

  • On the importance of civil rights during this political moment: "We need a robust civil rights division...in deciding how you want to vote, you should say, are the people who are in office actually worrying about the civil rights of all Americans and not just some Americans?"
  • On how to make cultural progress: "It's not good enough to just say, 'Look, I'm not a racist.' What you have to say is: 'What am I going to do to help change our culture, to make it better?' There's something that we can all do individually. There's certainly something the business community can do."

DeRay Mckesson highlighted how the present moment invites people to reimagine the concept of safety.

  • "The question is not police, no police. The question is like, how do I stay safe and what does safety look like? The police are not the best answer to that. The police aren't the only answer to that. And the police shouldn't be the answer that we fund when we think of that question."

Thank you Bank of America for sponsoring this event.

Jun 24, 2020 - Sports

Coronavirus cancels New York City Marathon

Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Organizers of the New York City Marathon announced they will be canceling the event this year, which would've celebrated its 50th anniversary, as the city remains engulfed in the coronavirus pandemic, The New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The marathon is one of the largest in the world with over 50,000 runners and 10,000 volunteers participating. Nearly a million fans spread out across the city to watch the 26.2-mile race. The marathon is both prestigious and lucrative for the city, per the Times.

Louisville police officer involved in Breonna Taylor shooting fired

Protesters hold pictures of Breonna Taylor, left, Andrew Kearse, center, and Ahmaud Arbery, right, during a demonstration on June 22 in Boston, Massachusetts. Photo: Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Louisville police officer Brett Hankison was fired on Tuesday, effective immediately, for "blindly" firing 10 bullets into Breonna Taylor's apartment on March 13, the police department announced.

Driving the news: Black Lives Matter protesters and activists on social media have called for punitive action in the wake of Taylor's death, after she was fatally shot by police who entered her apartment without warning through a "no-knock" warrant.