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Photo: Alexandra Schuler/picture alliance via Getty Images

The New York Police Department will disband its anti-crime unit, which consists of hundreds of plainclothes officers that target violent crime, commissioner Dermot Shea announced at a news conference Monday.

The big picture: The unit, which consists of some 600 officers, "was involved in some of the city’s most notorious police shootings," according to the New York Times. Officers in the unit will be given new assignments, including in the NYPD's neighborhood policing initiative.

What they're saying: "This is a seismic shift in the culture of how the NYPD polices this great city," Shea said at a press conference. "This is 21st-century policing. We must do it in a manner that builds trust between the officers and the community they serve.”

  • “What we always struggle with, I believe, as police executives, is not keeping crime down. It’s keeping crime down and keeping the community with us and I think those two things, at times, have been at odds."

Go deeper: The major police reforms that have been enacted since George Floyd's death

Go deeper

Harris rebukes Barr: "We do have two systems of justice in America"

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) pushed back on Attorney General Bill Barr's assertion on CNN that there are not two systems of justice in America, arguing that he and President Trump "are spending full time in a different reality."

Why it matters: The question of whether there is "systemic racism" in policing and criminal justice is a clear, dividing line between Democrats and the Trump administration.

20 mins ago - World

Iran's nuclear dilemma: Ramp up now or wait for Biden

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The world is waiting to see whether Iran will strike back at Israel or the U.S. over the assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the architect of Iran's military nuclear program.

Why it matters: Senior Iranian officials have stressed that Iran will take revenge against the perpetrators, but also respond by continuing Fakhrizadeh’s legacy — the nuclear program. The key question is whether Iran will accelerate that work now, or wait to see what President-elect Biden puts on the table.

Updated 1 hour ago - Health

U.K. first nation to clear Pfizer coronavirus vaccine for mass rollout

A health care worker during the phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trial by Pfizer and BioNTech in Ankara, Turkey, in October. Photo: Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The United Kingdom's government announced Wednesday it's approved Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine, which "will be made available across the U.K. from next week."

Why it matters: The U.K. has beaten the U.S. to become the first Western country to give emergency approval for a vaccine that's found to be 95% effective with no serious side effects against a virus that's killed nearly 1.5 million people globally.