Photo: John Paraskevas/Newsday/Getty Images

In the latest attempt to address the ongoing measles outbreak, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill on Thursday ending vaccination exemptions based on religious beliefs, reports the New York Times.

Why it matters: New York City has long been trying to figure out how to combat the measles outbreak — particularly because of the resistance of the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community to vaccinations. Cuomo said he understands the importance of religious freedom, but protecting public health is equally important, per the NYT.

The big picture: A growing number of states have moved to curtail religious exemptions for vaccinations this year following the uptick of measles. California, Arizona, West Virginia, Mississippi and Maine do not allow religious exemptions for vaccinations.

Go deeper...Chart: Measles outbreak this year has been worst of the century

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Postal slowdown threatens election breakdown

In 24 hours, signs of a pre-election postal slowdown have moved from the shadows to the spotlight, with evidence emerging all over the country that this isn't a just a potential threat, but is happening before our eyes.

Why it matters: If you're the Trump administration, and you're in charge of the federal government, remember that a Pew poll published in April found the Postal Service was viewed favorably by 91% of Americans.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 21,280,608 — Total deaths: 767,422— Total recoveries: 13,290,879Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 5,335,398 — Total deaths: 168,903 — Total recoveries: 1,796,326 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: The coronavirus-connected heart ailment that could lead to sudden death in athletes — Patients grow more open with their health data during pandemic.
  4. States: New York to reopen gyms, bowling alleys, museums.
  5. Podcasts: The rise of learning podsSpecial ed under pressure — Not enough laptops — The loss of learning.

USPS pushes election officials to pay more for mail ballots

Protesters gather in Kalorama Park in D.C. today before demonstrating outside the condo of Postmaster General Louis DeJoy. Photo: Cheriss May/Reuters

The Postal Service has urged state election officials to pay first class for mail ballots, which Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer says could nearly triple the cost.

Why it matters: Senate Democrats claim that "it has been the practice of USPS to treat all election mail as First Class mail regardless of the paid class of service."