Mar 28, 2020 - Politics & Policy

NRA sues California officials for designating gun stores non-essential

Photo: Sarah Reingewirtz/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

The National Rifle Association and other pro-gun groups filed a lawsuit against California Gov. Gavin Newsom and state officials on Friday after gun stores were deemed non-essential and required to close for the state's stay-at-home order amid the novel coronavirus outbreak.

Why it matters: Both Second Amendment advocates and gun control backers argue that shutting federally licensed firearms dealers could push buyers to purchase guns online or through private sales without background checks, per AP.

Yes, but: Gun control advocates are also concerned about a possible uptick in new owners who don't have access to training and don't understand how to store their weapons as multiple states issue stay-at-home orders.

The other side: Michael Cargill, owner of Central Texas Gun Works in Austin, told AP, “When there’s a national emergency, people are looking for food, water, shelter — that part is important to the survival of our nation. They are also looking for the Second Amendment to protect their families.”

The state of play: Background checks increased by 300% on March 16, compared with the same day last year, AP reports, citing federal data shared with the National Shooting Sports Foundation.

  • The national background check system has, as a result, been overwhelmed.
  • If a background check takes longer than three business days, gun dealers are able to make the sale go through unless their state has more stringent waiting periods or there is concern about the potential buyer.

Go deeper: Coronavirus efforts shift consumer interest toward booze, guns

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U.S. cities crackdown on protests against police brutality

Photo: Megan Jelinger/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of protesters gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.

Trump to invite Russia and other non-member G7 countries to summit

President Trump at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Saturday. Photo: Saul Martinez/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Saturday evening he would postpone the G7 summit to September and expand the meeting to more nations that are not members of the Group of 7.

Details: Trump said he would invite Russia, South Korea, Australia and India to the summit, according to a pool report. "I don’t feel that as a G7 it properly represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries," he said.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Thousands of protesters march in Denver, Colorado, on May 30. Photo: Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images)

Curfews are being imposed in Portland, Oregon, and Cincinnati, while the governors of Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio and Texas activated the National Guard following unrest in the states, per AP.

The big picture: Floyd's fatal run-in with police is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.