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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Novavax's shot could become the next coronavirus vaccine in the U.S. arsenal, potentially jumping ahead of AstraZeneca in the line for U.S. authorization, Politico reports.

Why it matters: The vaccine proved to be just as effective as Pfizer and Moderna's mRNA vaccines in a U.K. clinical trial, and could become a crucial tool in the global vaccination effort.

Between the lines: Novavax has never brought a product to market before, and began last-state clinical trials months after some of the other candidates.

  • But AstraZeneca's rollout has been plagued by a series of public relations mishaps, and it — along with Johnson & Johnson's shot — has been linked to rare but serious blood clots. J&J is also facing production concerns in the U.S.

By the numbers: Novavax has committed to provide 100 million doses of its shot to the U.S. later this year, and has promised to provide 1.1 billion doses to low- and middle-income countries.

  • The U.S. probably doesn't need any more vaccines. But the rest of the world does.

What we're watching: Whether the company can ramp up manufacturing enough to meet its ambitious goals.

  • "If that [would] face a challenge, it would be a big setback for COVAX in terms of delivering doses in 2021," Mesfin Teklu Tessema, senior director at the International Rescue Committee and a member of a civil society working group for COVAX, told Politico.

Go deeper

Apr 27, 2021 - Health

Brazil rejects Russia's Sputnik V vaccine, citing safety concerns

Photo: Jorge Bernal/Getty Images

Brazilian health regulators said this week they will not recommend importing Russia's Sputnik V vaccine, citing unknowns and safety concerns about the shot's development and manufacturing.

The big picture: Brazil has seen a recent surge in COVID-related cases and deaths, driven by relaxed mitigation measures and a more contagious local variant that has overwhelmed the country's health system. To date, roughly 6% of Brazil's population has been inoculated against the coronavirus, Bloomberg reports.

Apr 28, 2021 - World

In photos: COVID vaccinations around the world

A man is innoculated against COVID-19 at a health care post near Lukla, northeastern Nepal, April 23. UNICEF health officials say they've traveled for up to five days by air, road and with the help of "porters on foot," crossing mountains and rivers in regions including the Himalayas to deliver doses. Photo: Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images

Officials are stepping up efforts to reach some of the world's most remote regions in a global vaccination drive, as the world crosses 1 billion total COVID-19 vaccines administered.

The big picture: Most doses have gone to rich countries so far, but President Biden's pledge to soon export 60 million doses could be a global game-changer. The WHO is pushing to increase trust and investment in vaccines during World Immunization Week, which runs until Friday, with the message that "vaccines bring us closer."

Dave Lawler, author of World
Apr 26, 2021 - World

1 billion vaccine doses have now been given, mainly to the rich

Expand chart
Note: This map represents the total number of vaccines administered, not people vaccinated; Data: Our World in Data; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

The world has now crossed 1 billion total vaccines administered.

Breaking it down: Nearly half of those have come in the U.S. (29%), EU (13%) and U.K. (5%), with other rich countries also sprinting ahead. Another 22% have come in China and 14% in India. Africa, meanwhile, represents just 1.6% of vaccinations to date.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

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