Nov 30, 2017

North Korea reveals its new rocket

Kim Jong-un poses with what the North Korea government calls the Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile. Independent journalists were not given access, and the content cannot be verified. Photo: Korean Central News Agency / Korea News Service via AP

"North Korea released dozens of photos ... of the Hwasong-15, a new intercontinental ballistic missile it claims can reach any target in the continental United States. The photo dump, published in the paper and online editions of the ruling party's official daily, is a goldmine for rocket experts," AP reports:

Why it matters: The missile is "bigger, more advanced and comes with a domestically made mobile launcher that will make it harder than ever to pre-emptively destroy."

  • "But there's a potentially major catch: it might not have the power to go much farther than the West Coast if it is loaded down with a real nuclear warhead, not a dummy like the one it carried in its test launch."
  • Our thought bubble: Just the West Cost? Being able to take out L.A., the Silicon Valley and Seattle — not fine!

3 bites:

  • Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the U.N., at the Security Council: "The dictator of North Korea made a choice yesterday that brings the world closer to war." (CNN)
  • Haley: "If war comes, make no mistake: The North Korean regime will be utterly destroyed." (Reuters)
  • Trump yesterday in St. Charles, Mo.: "[T]hese massive tax cuts will be rocket fuel — (Laughter) — Little Rocket Man! Rocket fuel for the American economy. (Applause) He is a sick puppy."

Go deeper

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Biden: George Floyd's last words are "a wake-up call for our nation"

Former Vice President Joe Biden meets with clergy members and community activists during a visit to Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del. on June 1, 2020. Photo: JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Vice President Joe Biden is calling George Floyd’s dying words “a wake-up call for our nation,” and criticized President Trump’s decision to unleash tear gas on peaceful protesters outside the White House, in a civil rights speech from Philadelphia on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Biden in the address drew a sharp contrast between himself and Trump, whose first remarks addressing nationwide unrest Monday highlighted law and order, extreme demonstrations of militarized “strength” and other blustery threats.

Updated 30 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 6,302,318 — Total deaths: 376,322 — Total recoveries — 2,716,924Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 1,812,125 — Total deaths: 105,192 — Total recoveries: 458,231 — Total tested: 17,340,682Map.
  3. Public health: Protests against police brutality threaten coronavirus response.
  4. Business: Coronavirus could lower GDP by $15.7 trillion — More than 1 in 6 black workers lost jobs between February and April.
  5. Climate: The alarm over climate financial risk gets louder because of coronavirus.
  6. Media: Interest in the George Floyd protests has soared past the coronavirus.

The business of tear gas

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

U.S. forces yesterday used tear gas on peaceful protesters outside the White House gates, prior to a declared curfew, clearing a path for President Trump to visit a riot-damaged church for a photo opportunity.

The state of play: Two of the largest U.S. producers of tear gas are owned by private equity firms, but those firms have no interest in discussing their ownership.