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North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, flanked by army officials. Photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images

South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff say North Korea has fired 2 unidentified projectiles into the Sea of Japan, the South Korean Yonhap news agency reports.

Why it matters: The launch came hours after Pyongyang offered to resume nuclear talks with the U.S. This is the 10th such launch since May, in what appears to be yet another demonstration of North Korea expanding its weapons arsenal apparently with the intention of increasing leverage ahead of possible negotiations with the U.S.

Our military is monitoring the situation in case of additional launches and maintaining a readiness posture."
— South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff statement

Details: South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said the unidentified projectiles flew east from South Pyongan Province before landing in the sea on Tuesday morning local time, per Yonhap.

The big picture: North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui said in a statement Monday that North Korea was willing to have comprehensive discussions with the United States in late September at a time and place agreed between both sides, but the U.S. must come to the negotiating table with acceptable new proposals, according to the state-run KCNA news agency.

What he's saying: President Trump told reporters earlier that North Korea's offer for talks was "interesting," AP reports.

"We’ll see what happens. In the meantime, we have our hostages back, we’re getting the remains of our great heroes back and we’ve had no nuclear testing for a long time."
— President Trump to reporters

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.

Trump political team disavows "Patriot Party" groups

Marine One carries President Trump away from the White House on Inauguration Day. Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Donald Trump's still-active presidential campaign committee officially disavowed political groups affiliated with the nascent "Patriot Party" on Monday.

Why it matters: Trump briefly floated the possibility of creating a new political party to compete with the GOP — with him at the helm. But others have formed their own "Patriot Party" entities during the past week, and Trump's team wants to make clear it has nothing to do with them.