Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

North Carolina's election board on Thursday was compelled to remind residents that voting twice is a felony, after President Trump suggested that voters should vote once by mail and again in person on Election Day.

What they're saying: "Attempting to vote twice in an election or soliciting someone to do so also is a violation of North Carolina law," Karen Brinson Bell, executive director of the North Carolina State Board of Elections, said in a statement.

  • “There are numerous checks in place in North Carolina that prevent people from double voting. Electronic pollbooks with information about who has already voted are used at every early voting site,” Bell said.
  • “If a voter tries to check in who has already voted, they will be prevented from voting a regular ballot."

Driving the news: Trump made the suggestion during a visit to the key battleground state of North Carolina on Wednesday, saying voters should cast their ballots twice to test the mail-in system. His comments encouraging people to violate the law and vote twice were shocking given that he's railed against mail-in voting with baseless claims that increased mail-in ballots will lead to widespread voter fraud.

The big picture: Many states have expanded early and mail-in voting due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Go deeper: When and how to vote in all 50 states

Go deeper

How "naked ballots" could upend mail-in voting in Pennsylvania

Trump signs in Olyphant, Penn. Photo: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Pennsylvania's Supreme Court ordered state officials last week to throw out mail-in ballots submitted without a required inner "secrecy" envelope in November's election, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

The state of play: The decision went under the radar alongside the simultaneous decision to extend the time that mail-in ballots could be counted, but Philadelphia's top elections official warned state legislators this week that throwing out so-called "naked ballots" could bring "electoral chaos" to the state and cause "tens of thousands of votes" to be thrown out — potentially tipping the presidential election.

Michelle Obama: "Don't listen to people" who say voting is "rigged"

Michelle Obama. Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Glamour

Former First Lady Michelle Obama on Tuesday urged people to vote in spite of conspiracy theories and disinformation "about the validity of our election process," per CNN.

Between the lines: Officials are sounding the alarm about the heightened potential for disinformation in an unusual election year. That comes as President Trump has stoked fears of election fraud, telling "Axios on HBO" in August that "lots of things can happen" with voting by mail if the presidential race isn't decided on election night.

FBI: Foreign actors likely to sow disinformation about delays in election results

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency released a public service announcement on Tuesday warning that mail-in ballots "could leave officials with incomplete results on election night," and that foreign actors are likely to spread disinformation about the delays.

The bottom line: The agencies called on the public to "critically evaluate the sources of the information they consume and to seek out reliable and verified information from trusted sources," including state and local election officials.

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