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Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Nonprofit hospitals that did the best financially provided less charity care relative to their income than their less-well-off peers, according to a new study in JAMA.

The big picture: Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide charity care in exchange for their tax-exempt status, but they're increasingly under fire for their aggressive bill collection practices against low-income patients.

By the numbers: In 2017, nonprofit hospitals collectively generated $47.9 billion in net income and provided $14.2 billion in charity care.

  • The top-earning 25% of hospitals provided $11.50 in charity care for uninsured patients and $5.10 in charity care for the insured for every $100 of their overall net income, the study found.
  • But the third quartile of hospitals provided $72.30 in charity care for the uninsured and $40.90 in charity care for the insured for every $100 of their net income.
  • Hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid provided significantly less charity care than hospitals in other states.

What they're saying: "Nonprofit hospitals with substantial financial strength should consider more generous financial assistance eligibility criteria to reduce the financial risk exposure of disadvantaged uninsured and underinsured patients," the author concludes.

Go deeper:

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Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

As of Tuesday morning, we know a lot more about President-elect Joe Biden climate personnel orbit, even as picks for agencies like EPA and DOE are outstanding, so here are a few early conclusions.

Why it matters: They're the highest-level names yet announced who will have a role in what Biden is promising will be a far-reaching climate and energy agenda.

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Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Hannelore Foerster/Getty Images

A face familiar to Wall Street is back as a central player that this time will need to steer the country out of a deep economic crisis.

Driving the news: President-elect Joe Biden is preparing to nominate former Fed chair Janet Yellen to be Treasury secretary.

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Why it matters: Koch — chairman and CEO of Koch Industries, which Forbes yesterday designated as America's largest private company — has been the left's favorite face of big-spending political action.