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Grain bins damaged from the derecho in Marshalltown, Iowa, in August. Photo: Daniel Acker/Getty Images

The derecho that struck parts of Iowa and Indiana on August 10 resulted in roughly $7.5 billion in damages, per an October update to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric's database of billion-dollar weather disasters.

Why it matters: Based on that estimate, the Corn Belt storm complex was the most economically devastating thunderstorm event in U.S. history, though its losses are still being tallied, so the total may be revised in the future, per the Washington Post.

The big picture: The derecho destroyed more than 10 million acres of soybean and corn crops and was the presumed cause of at least four deaths, the Post writes.

  • Winds up to 112 mph were recorded in Midway, Iowa and 100-mph gusts were recorded in Hiawatha.

By the numbers: The cost of the fast-moving wind event exceeded that of nine of 2020's 10 landfalling hurricanes and tropical storms. It was surpassed only by Hurricane Laura, which struck Louisiana in late August and caused an estimated $14 billion in damage.

Go deeper

In pictures: Storm Zeta churns inland after lashing Louisiana

Debris on the streets as then-Hurricane Zeta passes over in Arabi, Louisiana, on Oct. 28. It's the third hurricane to hit Louisiana in about two months, after Laura and Delta. Photo: Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

Tropical Storm Zeta has killed at least two people, triggered flooding, downed powerlines and caused widespread outages since making landfall in Louisiana as a Category 2 hurricane on Wednesday.

The big picture: A record 11 named storms have made landfall in the U.S. this year. Zeta is the fifth named storm to do so in Louisiana in 2020, the most ever recorded. It weakened t0 a tropical storm early Thursday, as it continued to lash parts of Alabama and the Florida Panhandle with heavy rains and strong winds.

Off the Rails

Episode 5: The secret CIA plan

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer, Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 5: Trump vs. Gina — The president becomes increasingly rash and devises a plan to tamper with the nation's intelligence command.

In his final weeks in office, after losing the election to Joe Biden, President Donald Trump embarked on a vengeful exit strategy that included a hasty and ill-thought-out plan to jam up CIA Director Gina Haspel by firing her top deputy and replacing him with a protege of Republican Congressman Devin Nunes.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Empire State Building among hundreds to light up in Biden inauguration coronavirus tribute.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.