1Pink and yellow Marshmallow Peeps in Warminster, Pennsylvania. Photo: William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

There'll be no Peeps marshmallow candies produced for this Halloween — or Christmas or Valentine's Day either — because of the coronavirus pandemic, Just Born Quality Confections said, per Pennlive.com.

The big picture: The firm suspended production in two Pennsylvania facilities in March as the outbreak spread. Just Born resumed limited output in May, but said it won't make Peeps and other candies until next year to focus on meeting demand for next Easter. "We look forward to offering our fun seasonal shapes and packaging at all major seasons again beginning with Halloween of 2021," the company added.

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Trump and Biden clash over COVID: "It is what it is because you are who you are"

Joe Biden attacked President Trump at the presidential debate on Tuesday for his response to the coronavirus pandemic, accusing him of panicking and failing to prepare for the crisis when he was warned about it in February.

The big picture: "It is what it is because you are who you are," Biden said, alluding to an answer Trump gave in an interview with "Axios on HBO" when asked about the 150,000+ death toll from the coronavirus. Trump responded by claiming that Biden would not have shut down travel from China in the early days of the pandemic, and he defended his administration's mass production of ventilators and protective equipment.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
14 hours ago - Economy & Business

United States of burnout

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Postponed vacations, holidays in isolation and back-to-back virtual meetings are taking a toll on millions of American workers.

Why it matters: As we head into the fall, workers are feeling the burnout. Such a collective fraying of mental health at work could dampen productivity and hinder economic growth across the country.

Sep 29, 2020 - Health

Axios-Ipsos poll: Americans won't take Trump's word on vaccine

Data: Axios/Ipsos survey; Note: Margin of error for the total sample is ±3.2%; Chart: Axios Visuals

Barely two in 10 Americans would take a first-generation coronavirus vaccine if President Trump told them it was safe — one of several new measures of his sinking credibility in the latest wave of the Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Details: Given eight scenarios and asked how likely they were to try the vaccine in each case, respondents said they'd be most inclined if their doctor vouched for its safety (62%), followed by insurance covering the full cost (56%) or the FDA saying it's safe (54%).