Photo: Stephanie Keith via Getty Images

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley has resigned and will exit her role at the end of the year.

Why it matters: Widely considered one of the more moderate Republican voices left in Trump's Cabinet, Haley had earned praise from diplomats and politicians across the ideological spectrum during her time as UN ambassador. At a press conference announcing her resignation, President Trump thanked Haley for her service and told her she had "done a fantastic job."

What they're saying:

  • Vice President Mike Pence: "Nikki Haley served our nation with distinction, faithfully advancing President Trump's America First agenda and she will be missed. ... We will always be grateful for Ambassador Haley’s courage, intellect, character, and unfailing grace."
  • Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.): "Ambassador Nikki Haley has done an outstanding job as United States Ambassador to the United Nations and showed a level of effectiveness rarely seen by someone in this position. She is a clear, concise voice for American leadership, American values, and has been a true agent of reform when it came to the United Nations."
  • Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.): "Nikki Haley has been a clear, consistent, and powerful voice for America’s interests and democratic principles on the world stage. She challenged friend and foe to be better. I am saddened that she is leaving the administration, but so grateful for her service. Thank you, Nikki."
  • Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.): "Nikki Haley was a strong voice for the U.S. & for moral clarity at the UN America was blessed to have her representing us. We thank her & her family for their service to our country & the cause of freedom & #HumanRights."
  • Sen. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.): "Nikki Haley has set a new standard for what American leadership at the UN should look like. She stood with our allies and held our adversaries accountable, even when it required standing alone on the world stage. We will miss her, but we are all better off thanks to her service."
  • Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.): "For decades, dictators have tried to use the U.N. as a platform to give lip service to human rights and offer cheap promises to uphold peace. Ambassador Haley was unafraid to call out their BS & Americans should be grateful for her clarity and strength."
  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu: "I thank Ambassador Nikki Haley, who led an uncompromising fight against the United Nations’ hypocrisy and for truth and justice in our country."
  • Amnesty International: "We hope that Nikki Haley's shock resignation will bring an end to the current low point in relations between NGOs and the U.S. mission to the UN and that her successor will work to repair the relationships. Under her tenure human rights organizations like Amnesty and Human Rights Watch were singled out by her simply for having a different opinion, including on the importance of the Human Rights Council."

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 30,804,120 — Total deaths: 957,348— Total recoveries: 21,062,785Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 6,766,631 — Total deaths: 199,268 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning
  4. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  6. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19 — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.

What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

America’s rapid and urgent transition to online school has come with a host of unforeseen consequences that are only getting worse as it continues into the fall.

The big picture: The issues range from data privacy to plagiarism, and schools are ill-equipped to deal with them, experts say.

The positions of key GOP senators on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee by next week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just over six weeks out from Election Day.

The big picture: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." But Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) told Alaska Public Media, "I would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. We are 50 some days away from an election."