Nov 4, 2019

Nikki Haley: "Trump and I understood each other"

Cover: St. Martin's Press

Nikki Haley, the former U.N. ambassador and South Carolina governor, will be out Nov. 12 with "With All Due Respect: Defending America with Grit and Grace" (represented by Robert Barnett).

Excerpt:

"When I had an idea about a direction for U.S. foreign policy — with regard to Iran, Venezuela, North Korea, or elsewhere — I could pick up the phone and call the president. Our communication was nearly constant, and it was straightforward. We didn’t always see eye-to-eye. Sometimes I called to privately express my disagreement with a policy. But he always took the call and he always listened. Usually, as in the case of the Iran deal, we agreed."

"The result was that I had unusual latitude to operate as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. I was free to largely chart my own course — and I did. It was not a typical situation for a UN ambassador. But President Trump and I understood each other. I knew my responsibility to act in accordance with his objectives. And he trusted me enough to allow me to be flexible with how I executed his wishes. He also knew I would be honest with him when I disagreed, and he appreciated that."

Book tour.

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Nikki Haley says Rex Tillerson claimed people would die if Trump was unchecked

Photo: Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley wrote in her new memoir, “With All Due Respect," that former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and former Chief of Staff John Kelly tried and failed to recruit her to subvert President Trump in order to "save the country," according to the Washington Post.

Why it matters: Haley's allegations add to an already long list of accounts of aides seeking to undermine Trump in the early stages of the administration, including reports that advisers took documents from the president's desk to prevent him from signing them.

Go deeperArrowNov 10, 2019

Expanding U.S. pressure campaign on Iran could reach a tipping point

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Tuesday marks the first anniversary of the Trump administration's "maximum pressure" campaign against Iran, which escalated further last week with new State Department findings that link the country's construction sector to its Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.

Why it matters: The maximum pressure policy has undoubtedly hurt Iran's economy, but it risks becoming a victim of its own success if dried-up revenues spark Iran to lash out further. While Washington has mostly avoided open conflict thus far, following that path may be harder as Iran grows more defiant.

Go deeperArrowNov 4, 2019

South Korea: U.S. "very actively" coaxing North Korea to return to nuclear talks

Photo: Dong-A Ilbo via Getty Images/Getty Images

Chung Eui-yong, South Korea's national security adviser, said on Sunday that the United States is “very actively” trying to convince North Korea to return to negotiations ahead of an unofficial deadline for dialogue, Reuters reports.

Background: North Korea's leader Kim Jong-un warned in October that the U.S. had until year’s end to take a "substantial step to make complete and irreversible withdrawal" of its "hostile policy." Chung said South Korea is taking North Korea's deadline "very seriously."

Go deeperArrowNov 10, 2019