Photo: Peter Summers/Getty Images

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage told Sky News on Sunday that he'd prefer to extend the Brexit deadline past Oct. 31 in order to hold a general election than see Parliament pass the divorce deal struck by the EU and Prime Minister Boris Johnson last week.

"This is a rotten deal. ... I do understand because of Brexit fatigue and anger in the country the temptation to vote for it. But it is nothing more than Brexit in name only, it will not solve anything. This will not end things."

Why it matters: Farage, who was a key figure in the 2016 referendum on leaving the European Union, is one of the U.K.'s most influential and controversial politicians. He favors a "clean break" Brexit over Johnson's deal, which is similar to the one his predecessor, Theresa May, saw repeatedly rejected in Parliament, with some tweaks around the crucial issue of Northern Ireland.

The big picture: Farage has not yet signaled whether his newly formed Brexit Party would challenge Conservative Party seats in the next election if the U.K. fails to leave the EU on Oct. 31. If Johnson campaigns on the deal he has brought to Parliament, the Brexit Party could cannibalize some of the seats where voters favor a so-called "clean break."

Go deeper: U.K. Parliament thwarts Boris Johnson's Brexit plan

Go deeper

SurveyMonkey poll: Young voters' red-state blue wall

Data: SurveyMonkey; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

There are only five states in the U.S. where voters younger than 35 embrace President Trump over Joe Biden, and none are swing states, according to new 50-state SurveyMonkey-Tableau data for Axios.

Why it matters: These scattered red spots in a sea of blue vividly illustrate Trump's peril if young people were to actually turn out this year. Put another way, Trump's path to re-election depends heavily on younger adults staying home.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Chris Christie: Wear a mask "or you may regret it — as I did" — Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted relief bill.
  2. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  3. Health: New York reports most cases since MayStudies show drop in death rate.
  4. Education: San Francisco public schools likely won't reopen before the end of the year.
  5. World: Spain becomes first nation in Western Europe to exceed 1 million cases — France becomes the second.
Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. officials: Iran and Russia aim to interfere in election

Iran and Russia have obtained voter registration information that can be used to undermine confidence in the U.S. election system, Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe announced at a press conference Wednesday evening.

Why it matters: The revelation comes roughly two weeks before Election Day. Ratcliffe said Iran has sent threatening emails to Democratic voters this week in states across the U.S. and spread videos claiming that people can vote more than once.

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