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A view of Dolphins stadium on Aug. 29. Photo: Mark Brown/Getty Images

The Cowboys, Chiefs and Dolphins are the only NFL teams that have promised to have fans in the stands during their first game of the regular season, the Boston Globe reports.

Why it matters: Over 75% of the league has ruled out admitting fans at home openers over concerns about the coronavirus pandemic, though a normal game-day experience for teams that do allow fans will be elusive.

The big picture: The Kansas City Chiefs will only have 16,000 fans, around 20% of capacity, in attendance during their first three home games, while the Miami Dolphins will only admit 13,000 on Sept. 20 to see them play the Bills.

  • The Dallas Cowboys have yet to announce a plan, though owner Jerry Jones promised to allow some fans, according to the Globe.
  • Another six teams — the Cardinals, Panthers, Browns, Colts, Jaguars and Buccaneers — hope to allow fans but local authorities have yet to approve their plans.

Of note: Miami and Dallas are two of the largest coronavirus hotspots in the country, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

Go deeper: NFL teams suspend practice over Jacob Blake shooting

Go deeper

Updated Nov 27, 2020 - Sports

NFL reschedules Thanksgiving matchup for second time due to COVID outbreak

Photo: Rob Carr/Getty Images

The NFL has once again postponed a Baltimore Ravens-Pittsburgh Steelers matchup originally scheduled for primetime on Thanksgiving day due to a COVID-19 outbreak.

Why it matters: It's the first time the league has had to scrap a game since October, as the U.S. copes with another surge in coronavirus infections heading into the holidays.

19 mins ago - World

Special report: Trump's U.S.-China transformation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump began his term by launching the trade war with China he had promised on the campaign trail. By mid-2020, however, Trump was no longer the public face of China policy-making as he became increasingly consumed with domestic troubles, giving his top aides carte blanche to pursue a cascade of tough-on-China policies.

Why it matters: Trump alone did not reshape the China relationship. But his trade war shattered global norms, paving the way for administration officials to pursue policies that just a few years earlier would have been unthinkable.

McConnell: Trump "provoked" Capitol mob

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Tuesday that the pro-Trump mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was "provoked by the president and other powerful people."

Why it matters: Trump was impeached by the House last week for "incitement of insurrection." McConnell has not said how he will vote in Trump's coming Senate impeachment trial, but sources told Axios' Mike Allen that the chances of him voting to convict are higher than 50%.

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