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California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) pointedly told President Trump on Monday afternoon that climate change is "exacerbating" the wildfires currently ravaging the West Coast.

Why it matters: Trump has repeatedly insisted that the fires were "about forest management," while dismissing climate change. Newsom acknowledged to Trump that "we have not done justice on our forest management," but emphasized that climate change was making everything much worse. A number of politicians have criticized Trump and his administration for not properly addressing climate change.

  • Trump has questioned the existence of human-caused climate change and has started the process of formally withdrawing the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement.

What Newsom's saying: "We obviously feel very strongly that the hots are getting hotter, the dries are getting dryer. When we're having heat domes, the likes of which we've never seen in our history, the hottest August ever in the history of this state, the ferocity of these fires, the drought five-plus years, losing 163 million trees to that drought, something's happened to the plumbing of the world."

  • "And we come from a perspective, humbly, where we submit the science and observed evidence is self-evident that climate change is real and that is exacerbating this."
  • "There's no question when you look past this decade and looking past almost the thousand-plus years that we have not done justice on our forest management. I don't think anyone disputes that."

Trump later said, "It'll start getting cooler. You just watch."

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Amy Harder: Trump saying it will get cooler is similar to when he has said the coronavirus would disappear. In both cases, the opposite has and will happen. COVID-19 has gotten worse, and Earth's aggregate temperature has already gone up and will continue to go up in the coming decades.

Between the lines: The weather, however, will get colder, as we approach fall and winter, which Trump may seize on to say he was right, even though on the scale that makes a difference with climate change — decades and centuries — he is still wrong.

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Dec 19, 2020 - Energy & Environment

"The Ministry for the Future": How to solve the climate crisis

Photo: Hachette Book Group

A recent novel illustrates the likely consequences of climate change in the decades to come, and offers hope that better technology and politics might help us save the future.

Why it matters: Perhaps no subject as important as climate change has also proven so difficult to effectively and accurately dramatize. "The Ministry for the Future" is the one novel I've read that captures the consequences of warming while offering a realistic blueprint for how we can stop it.

Twitter debuts subscription products to help double revenue by 2023

Photo: Cole Burston/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Twitter said Thursday that it plans to increase the amount of money it makes off of its users by allowing them to pay creators directly for content they like.

Why it matters: The company is trying to broaden its revenue stream away from being dependent mostly on ads, and particularly on ads from big brands.

DHS directing $77 million to combat domestic violent extremism in states, cities

DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

For the first time, states and localities will spend at least $77 million of Department of Homeland Security grant money on combatting domestic violent extremism, DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas announced on Thursday.

Why it matters: Domestic terrorism has been on the rise in the U.S., spurred on by growing polarization and the mainstreaming of online conspiracy theories. In the wake of the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, Mayorkas has made fighting the problem a "National Priority Area."