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Inmate firefighters arrive at the scene of California's Water fire. Photo: Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) signed a law on Friday that will allow some inmates who volunteer as firefighters to have their records expunged, making it easier for them to become professional firefighters after being released from prison.

Why it matters: Inmate firefighters play a pivotal role in battling blazes across the state, but once released, they are required to disclose their convictions when applying for jobs, making it harder to get hired.

What he's saying: "CA’s inmate firefighter program is decades-old and has long needed reform," Newsom tweeted Friday, along with a picture of him signing the law surrounded by a scorched area.

  • "Inmates who have stood on the frontlines, battling historic fires should not be denied the right to later become a professional firefighter."

The big picture: About 3,700 incarcerated people are part of California's inmate firefighter program, with roughly 2,600 qualified to work fire lines.

  • More than 14,800 firefighters are currently fighting 28 major wildfires burning across California, according to Cal Fire.
  • At least 10 people have died in the the North Complex fire, which has destroyed or damaged about 2,000 structures, per AP.
  • The August Complex, currently raging north of Sacramento, is the biggest wildfire event in California history, consuming more than 746,607 acres.

Worth noting: Inmates convicted of serious crimes including, rape, murder, kidnapping or arson, will not be eligible for having their records expunged.

Inmate crews set backfires to heavy brush as firefighters try to keep the 2019 Easy fire from crossing the road. Photo:  Brian van der Brug/ Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Inmate firefighters walk the road leading to the Reagan Library during the 2019 Easy Fire in Simi Valley, California. Photo: Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images
Inmate firefighters take a break while battling the 2019 Kincade Fire in Healdsburg, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
A crew of inmate firefighters takes a break during firefighting operations to battle the 2019 Kincade Fire in Healdsburg, California. Photo: Philip Pacheco/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper

In photos: Americans wait at food banks before Thanksgiving

Residents line up in their cars at a food distribution site in Clermont, Fla., Nov. 21. Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Thousands of Americans waited in long lines at food banks in the week before Thanksgiving to pick up turkeys, canned goods, broccoli and other vegetables.

Why it matters: As the holiday season approaches, families across the U.S. are in need of food assistance due to chronic unemployment and economic hardship caused by COVID-19 — and many food pantries already served an unprecedented number of people this spring.

Georgia governor declines Trump's request to overturn election result

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp pushed back on Saturday after President Trump pressed him to help overturn the state's election results.

Driving the news: Trump asked the Republican governor over the phone Saturday to call a special legislative session aimed at overturning the presidential election results in Georgia, per the Washington Post. Kemp refused.