Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. Photo: Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

New Zealand's tough new gun laws are set to come into effect Friday after members of parliament voted overwhelmingly to back the measure at the bill's final reading Wednesday night local time.

Details: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced last month all military-style semi-automatic weapons and assault rifles would be banned. Only 1 MP voted against the measure, introduced in response to the Christchurch terrorist attack. Under the new law, anyone found with a banned gun faces up to 5 years in prison.

What she's saying: Ardern fought back tears as she completed the final reading of the bill. "We are here just 26 days after the most devastating of terrorist attacks created the darkest of days in New Zealand’s history," she said. "These weapons were designed to kill, and they were designed to maim and that is what they did on the 15th of March."

Go deeper

General Motors tries to revive incendiary lawsuit vs. Fiat Chrysler

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

General Motors is trying to revive an incendiary lawsuit against Fiat Chrysler Automobiles with explosive new allegations including bribes paid from secret offshore bank accounts and a union official acting as a double agent between the two automotive giants.

Why it matters: The extraordinary legal battle is occurring amid earth-shaking changes in the global auto industry that threaten to turn both litigants into dinosaurs if they aren't nimble enough to pivot to a future where transportation is a service, cars run on electrons and a robot handles the driving.

2 hours ago - Health

Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning

Gov. Cuomo on July 23 in New York City. Photo: Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that all school districts across the state can choose to reopen for in-person learning because it has so far maintained low enough coronavirus transmission rates.

Why it matters: It’s another sign that the state, once the global epicenter of the pandemic, has — at least for now — successfully curbed the spread of the virus even as infections have surged elsewhere around the country.

Appeals court allows House Democrats to continue lawsuit for Don McGahn testimony

Don McGahn in an October 2018 Cabinet meeting. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A D.C. appeals court on Friday allowed House Democrats to continue their case for testimony from former White House counsel Don McGahn before the House Judiciary Committee.

Why it matters: The ruling has broader implications beyond this specific instance, agreeing that Congress has the standing to sue to enforce subpoenas against executive branch officials even if the White House refuses to comply.