Courtesy of The New York Times

The stark front page of today's New York Times, plus three inside pages, consist of two-line obituaries ("Always first on the dance floor. ... Preferred bolo ties and suspenders") for 1,000 of the nearly 100,000 Americans who have died of the coronavirus — 1% of the toll.

The big picture: A huge team at The Times drew the accounts "from hundreds of obituaries, news articles and paid death notices that have appeared in newspapers and digital media over the past few months."

  • Marc Lacey, national editor, said: "I wanted something that people would look back on in 100 years to understand the toll of what we’re living through."

A sampling:

  • Cornelia Ann Hunt, 87, Virginia Beach, her last words were "thank you" • Rita Paas, 88, Comstock Park, Mich., never missed "Wheel of Fortune," "Jeopardy" or "Lawrence Welk" • Lila A. Fenwick, 87, New York City, first black woman to graduate from Harvard Law School • Alice Coopersmith Furst, 87, Kentfield, Calif., in the first class of girls admitted to the Bronx High School of Science.
  • Bobby Lee Barber, 84, Buckley, Wash., Seahawks season-ticket holder • Rhoda Hatch, 73, Chicago, first in her family to graduate college • Regina Dix-Parsons, 75, Schenectady, N.Y., stalwart church gospel singer • Lakisha Willis White, 45, Orlando, Fla., was helping to raise some of her dozen grandchildren.
  • Barbara Yazbeck Vethacke, 74, St. Clair Shores, Mich., she was known to many as Babs • June Beverly Hill, 85, Sacramento, no one made creamed potatoes or fried sweet corn the way she did • Kimarlee Nguyen, 33, Everett, Mass., writer who inspired her Brooklyn high school students • Kamal Ahmed, 69, New York City, hotel banquet worker and Bangladeshi leader • Israel Sauz, 22, Broken Arrow, Okla., new father.

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Updated Oct 7, 2020 - Health

World coronavirus updates

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Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

New Zealand now has active no coronavirus cases in the community after the final six people linked to the Auckland cluster recovered, the country's Health Ministry confirmed in an email Wednesday.

The big picture: The country's second outbreak won't officially be declared closed until there have been "no new cases for two incubation periods," the ministry said. Auckland will join the rest of NZ in enjoying no domestic restrictions from late Wednesday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said, declaring that NZ had "beat the virus again."

Colleges drive a new wave of coronavirus hotspots

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Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Note: Washington state case count does not include Sept. 1; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

America’s brief spurt of progress in containing the coronavirus has stalled out.

Why it matters: We had a nice little run of improvement over the past month or so, but cases are now holding steady at a rate that’s still far too high to consider the outbreak under control.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Sep 2, 2020 - Health

America's botched coronavirus response foretells a dark future

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

America's failures in handling the coronavirus pandemic bode ill for our ability to deal with climate change and other threats that loom on the horizon.

Why it matters: America's ongoing struggles with the coronavirus have caused tremendous human and economic pain. But what should worry us for future disasters that could be far worse is the way the pandemic has exposed deep political divisions and a disinformation ecosystem that muddies even the hardest facts.