May 5, 2020 - Health

New York reports 1,700 new coronavirus deaths in nursing homes

Medical workers preparing for a patient in a nursing home in Queens, New York, on April 22. Photo: John Nacion/NurPhoto via Getty Images

New York on Tuesday reported more than 1,700 previously undisclosed coronavirus deaths at nursing homes and adult care facilities in the state, AP reports.

Why it matters: The new figures reveal a spike in nursing home deaths that includes people believed to have died from the coronavirus before their positive diagnosis could be confirmed.

  • At least 4,813 people died from the virus in New York nursing homes and care facilities since March 1, according to a count released by the state on Monday.
  • The exact number of nursing home and care facility deaths in the state is uncertain because the released tally does not include residents who were transferred to hospitals before dying.

By the numbers: The tally indicates that 22 nursing homes, largely in New York City and Long Island, have reported at least 40 deaths.

  • Parker Jewish Institute in Queens has reported the highest number of deaths with 71.

What they're saying: "I would take these numbers now with a grain of salt," Cuomo said in a press conference Tuesday. "I think they are going to change over time.

  • "Nursing homes, we said from day one, are the most vulnerable place, because it's old people — senior people — who are the vulnerable people in a congregate setting."

The big picture: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned early in the pandemic that older people and those with other health complications face a higher risk of dying from the virus.

  • Cuomo said he does not know what the state can do to better protect nursing home residents going forward.
  • "It's something we're studying. We're also doing an investigation with the attorney general to look at it."

Go deeper: Maryland to require coronavirus tests for all nursing home residents

Go deeper

Updated 17 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.

Coronavirus cases spike in Texas, Oregon and Arizona

Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise, Naema Ahmed/Axios

Texas, Arizona and Oregon saw significant spikes last week in new coronavirus infections, while cases also continued to climb in a handful of states where steady increases have become the norm.

Why it matters: Nationwide, new cases have plateaued over the past week. To get through this crisis and safely continue getting back out into the world, we need them to go down — a lot.

19 hours ago - Health

HHS requests data on race and ethnicity with coronavirus test results

A nurse writes a note as a team of doctors and nurses performs a procedure on a coronavirus patient in the Regional Medical Center on May 21 in San Jose, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.