Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

New York City health officials reported zero new coronavirus deaths on Sunday for the first time since the state's first death was recorded on March 11, according to NBC New York.

Why it matters: Once the epicenter of the U.S. and global outbreak, New York successfully flattened its curve and has thus far proven to be a model for how states can safely and cautiously lift lockdown restrictions.

The big picture: In total, New York state has reported over 401,000 confirmed coronavirus cases and over 32,000 deaths. Meanwhile, infections are surging in states across the Sunbelt that moved to quickly reopen after the initial outbreaks, with Florida reporting a record-breaking 15,000 new cases on Sunday.

Go deeper: Coronavirus cases rise in 33 states

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3 hours ago - Health

Florida reports another daily record for coronavirus deaths

Nurse practitioner Barbara Corral and a research assistant conduct a COVID-19 vaccination study on August 7 in Hollywood, Florida. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's health department on Tuesday reported 276 new coronavirus deaths, surpassing the state's record from July 31.

The big picture: The state also recorded over 5,800 new cases — on the low side for a state that is one of the domestic epicenters for the virus.

Updated 19 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

The number of COVID-19 cases surpassed 20 million worldwide on Monday evening, Johns Hopkins data shows.

The big picture: World Health Organization chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told a virtual press conference as the world approached the milestone that 750,000 deaths were set to be recorded this week. "Every life lost matters," he said. "But I want to be clear: there are green shoots of hope and... it's never too late to turn the outbreak around."

State coronavirus testing plans fall short of demand

Data: Department of Health and Human Services via Harvard Global Health Institute; Note: New York City's plan is included in New York state; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The U.S. plans to test around 600,000 people for the coronavirus every day this month, according to plans that states submitted to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Yes, but: That's likely a drop in testing, compared to July, and it's not enough to meet national demand. By December, states said they plan to ramp up to around a collective 850,000 people tested a day — which also likely will not be enough.