Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced at a press conference on Wednesday that schools will not fully reopen in fall, and will instead adopt a hybrid model that will limit in-person attendance to just one to three days a week.

Why it matters: New York City, once the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S., is home to the nation's largest public school district — totaling 1,800 schools and 1.1 million students, according to the New York Times. The partial reopening plan could prevent hundreds of thousands of parents from fully returning to work.

What they're saying:

"Through a mix of in-school and at-home learning we can make more space in every classroom and building. That means most kids coming to school 2 days a week. It’s a first for NYC public schools but it’s the only way to bring kids back safely. What we WON'T do is ignore the science and recklessly charge ahead like our president. We will do it the right way. We will keep everyone safe."
— De Blasio in a tweet

The big picture: Other states have announced they will fully reopen schools in fall despite major spikes in confirmed COVID-19 cases. New York has taken a more cautious approach to reopening.

  • Florida Education commissioner Richard Corcoran said this week that schools will fully reopen in fall.
  • Massachusetts has said schools can reopen with at least three feet of distance between students, per NPR.

Yes, but: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) could still claim authority over NYC schools and block De Blasio's timeline for reopening, per the New York Times.

  • And the plan is based on current case numbers, meaning fluctuations could alter de Blasio's vision for reopening schools.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Note: Does not include probable deaths from New York City; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The U.S. plans to test around 600,000 people for the coronavirus every day in August, according to plans that states submitted to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Why it matters: That's likely a drop in testing, compared to July, and it's not enough to meet national demand. The Trump administration has said it's up to states to develop their own plans for diagnostic testing. Those plans, when put together, still don't present an effective mitigation strategy, at least in light of the size of today's outbreak.

Aug 10, 2020 - Sports

The cost of kids losing gym class

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

With a growing number of schools opting for online-only classes this fall to limit the spread of COVID-19, physical education will be severely limited, if not suspended altogether.

Why it matters: While classroom-based learning can be done virtually, it's nearly impossible to replicate physical education — which plays a crucial role in kids' physical and mental health — through a screen. And with sports on hold in most states, PE is the only physical activity outlet some kids have.

Aug 10, 2020 - Health

97,000 children test positive for coronavirus in two weeks

A boy has his temperature checked as he receives a free COVID-19 test in South Los Angeles in July. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

At least 97,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 in the final two weeks of July and there's been an estimated 338,000 cases involving kids in the U.S. since the pandemic began, a new report finds.

Why it matters: The report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children's Hospital Association comes as schools and day cares look to reopen in the U.S.