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NIAID scientists identify and isolate anti-HIV antibodies. Photo: NIAID

Two separate research teams showed a unique combinations of antibodies led to 100% protection from HIV-like viruses in test monkeys. They'll next enter human clinical trials, first testing their safety, in the hopes of eventually creating both a vaccine and therapies.

What they did: The two studies published Wednesday — one using a "first of a kind" antibody molecule that can bind to three different places on the HIV virus and the other using a cocktail of two single antibodies — state they believe the antibodies' ability to target different regions of the virus, which can mutate rapidly, prevented infection.

Why it is important: In the U.S., roughly 1.1 million people are living with HIV, and one in seven of them don't know it. The majority of new cases are reported in the South, showing a disparity of infection rates.

Study 1 details: NIH investigators working with the pharmaceutical company Sanofi created an antibody with three HIV-binding segments. "This has never been done before," NIH scientist and study author Richard Koup told Axios. By testing and finding the best performing combination of three antibodies and then combining them into one, they were able to effectively hit all the types of HIV virus they tested in monkeys.

Barton Haynes, an immunologist who was not part of the study, said the "new strategy in the case of the trispecific antibody for dealing with HIV diversity" was significant.

Added benefit: Another benefit to developing the trispecific antigen, Koup said, is that it could be applied to other resistant diseases, like cancer, Ebola, Zika, yellow fever and tuberculosis. Ebola, for example, has multiple strains that a single antibody may not cover but the trispecific antibody might be able to.

Study 2 details: A separate study (although some of the scientists overlapped between the two) developed a "cocktail" of two antibodies that together targeted different regions of the HIV virus and prevented 100% of the monkeys from becoming infected. These results were compared with using only one antibody, which resulted in little protection. "These data suggest that a combination antibody approach will likely be more effective than single antibodies for both prevention and treatment of HIV infection in humans, as a result of HIV diversity and resistance," study author Dan Barouch told Axios.

Yes, but: Koup warned that HIV vaccine and treatment protocol is still years away. "This is a major advance toward the development of a preventative strategy, but it's not a vaccine," Koup said. "We are still working toward the goal of creating a vaccine."

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  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
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  5. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
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Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
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AI and automation are creating a hybrid workforce

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.

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