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Photo: Carmen Mandato/Getty Images

Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) in a letter on Monday admonished the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) for their unequal treatment of men's and women's basketball teams during this month's March Madness tournaments.

Catch up quick: Women's collegiate basketball teams were given a fraction of the resources during their March Madness tournament that the men's teams were provided, including unequal access to workout equipment and the availability of quality COVID-19 tests.

  • The NCAA originally said the women's facilities did not have enough space for more workout equipment. After a social media uproar, the NCAA corrected the weight room situation.

Yes, but: The senators say differences in COVID-19 tests made available to men and women athletes are in need of further attention.

  • "[I]t is the NCAA’s decision to provide only the men’s tournament with the 'gold standard' of COVID-19 tests that defies explanation and common sense," the senators wrote to NCAA president Mark Emmert.
  • "According to the coach of the eleven-time national champion UConn Huskies women's basketball team, while men have been using the more accurate PCR testing method, women have instead received the cheaper antigen tests, which are less sensitive and therefore can be less accurate."
  • "It is indefensible that the NCAA would not set the same standards for both tournaments. We ask that you take immediate action to rectify this inequity."

Their bottom line: "You must end this inexcusable pattern of inequities and neglect, and be transparent with these stellar women athletes about the steps you will take to ensure they have the same opportunities and support as their male counterparts," the pair wrote.

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Mar 29, 2021 - Sports

Eight of the 10 most-followed NCAA Elite 8 basketball players are women

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Impending legislation will allow student-athletes to monetize their name, image and likeness (NIL) through sponsored social media posts and other means.

Why it matters: If athletes had full control of their NIL rights, the top women's basketball players in this year's Elite Eight would have greater earning power than the top men.

Suspect in FedEx shooting identified as 19-year-old former FedEx employee Brandon Hole

Crime scene investigators walk through the FedEx parking lot in Indianapolis the day after a mass shooting left nine dead, including the gunman, who took his own life. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images.

The suspected gunman in Thursday's mass shooting at an Indianapolis FedEx facility that left at least eight people dead and multiple others wounded, has been identified by local police as 19-year-old Brandon Hole, a former employee of FedEx, a company spokesperson Bonny Harrison told the AP.

The latest: Law enforcement has not yet uncovered the shooter's motive. Police Chief Randal Taylor said Friday morning that the warehouse employed a "significant" number of Sikhs, AP reports, and the Sikh Coalition confirmed that members of its community were among those who were injured and killed.

The legacy of Bernie Madoff

Bernie Madoff, architect of the largest Ponzi scheme in American history, died on Wednesday in federal prison, 11 years into his 150-year sentence.

Axios Re:Cap digs into Madoff’s crimes, what they revealed about America's financial system and what changed after the scheme came crashing down with Diana B. Henriques, author of the The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust.