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A miniaturized source of quantum entanglement. Photo: Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore

A nanosatellite can be used to produce a detectable quantum signal in space, researchers report.

Why it matters: Researchers envision creating global quantum communications networks, but quantum signals can't currently be transmitted long distances. Constellations of small, relatively less-expensive satellites that beam the signals from space to receivers on Earth have been proposed as a way to circumvent the problem.

How it works: In an entangled pair of photons, the state of one photon is linked to that of the other regardless of how much distance is between them — a principle of quantum mechanics that researchers want to use to distribute quantum keys for communications.

  • If a message sent with a quantum key is intercepted or attempted to be intercepted, the state of the photon would be changed and the key would no longer work.
  • Photons can be carried on fiber-optic cables but not for long distances because the signal can be scattered or absorbed by the cables.
  • Researchers instead want to use satellites as nodes for distributing quantum signals.

What they did: Aitor Villar from the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore and his colleagues built a miniature source for entangling photons and put it aboard a CubeSat, a roughly 10 x 10 x 30-centimeter nanosatellite.

  • They report the source could withstand being launched on a rocket and produced a signal with the reduced power available on a nanosatellite in low-Earth orbit.
  • The system, which weighs 2.6 kg and is called SpooQy-1, shines a blue laser diode on nonlinear crystals to create the entangled photon pairs.
  • "This shows that entanglement technology can be deployed with minimal resources in novel operating environments, providing valuable ‘space heritage’ for different components and assembling techniques," the authors write in the journal Optica.

What it solves: A team led by Jian-Wei Pan of the University of Science and Technology in Hefei, China, has generated quantum signals on satellites, but a single satellite cannot currently cover the entire globe.

What's next: The researchers are now working on a system to send the entangled photon pair from the CubeSat to a ground receiver.

  • Go deeper: China reports key advance in encrypted long-range communications (Axios)

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Aug 26, 2020 - Technology

New federal centers announced for AI and quantum computing

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The White House this morning announced over $1 billion to establish 12 new federal research centers dedicated to AI and quantum sciences.

Why it matters: The two fields are among the most important in emerging technology, and the new initiative will help the U.S. assert its international leadership in an increasingly competitive field that will impact everything from national security to climate change.

12 mins ago - World

Report: "Clear evidence" China is committing genocide against Uyghurs

The scene in 2019 of a site believed to be a re-education camp where mostly Muslim ethnic minorities are detained, north of Kashgar in China's northwestern Xinjiang region. Photo: Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

Chinese authorities have breached "each and every act prohibited" under the UN Genocide Convention over the treatment of Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities in China's Xinjiang province, an independent report published Tuesday alleges.

Why it matters: D.C. think-tank the Newlines Institute for Strategy and Policy, which released the report, said in a statement the conclusions by dozens of experts in war crimes, human rights and international law are "clear and convincing": The ruling Chinese Communist Party bears responsibility.

Updated 2 hours ago - Technology

Twitter sues Texas AG Ken Paxton

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton at February's Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Twitter on Monday filed a lawsuit against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R), saying that his office launched an investigation into the social media giant because it banned former President Trump from its platform.

Driving the news: Twitter is seeking to halt an investigation launched by Paxton into moderation practices by Big Tech firms including Twitter for what he called "the seemingly coordinated de-platforming of the President," days after they banned him following the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.