Jan 14, 2020

Pelosi demands briefing on alleged Russian hack of Burisma

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Jan. 14. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Tuesday responded to reports that a Russian military intelligence unit successfully targeted Burisma, the Ukrainian gas company that once employed Joe Biden's son as a board member, and demanded that Congress be briefed on the administration's knowledge of the hack.

Why it matters: Pelosi called the reports "alarming" and said they serve as evidence that Russia is "continuing to interfere in our elections to benefit the President and to undermine our democracy."

  • Security experts told the New York Times that the Russian hackers may be searching for "potentially embarrassing material" about the Biden family to damage the former vice president's 2020 campaign.

What she's saying: Pelosi said U.S. intelligence officials have warned that Russia is attempting to compromise the 2020 election and that President Trump has refused "to take meaningful action to strengthen our election security."

  • “American elections should be decided by the American people, not by the Russian Government."
  • “The President and every Republican Senator must explain to the American people why they are refusing to defend our national security and the integrity of our elections."

Pelosi also accused Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) of "giving hostile foreign powers the green light to attack our country" by refusing to vote on the "For The People Act," an election security bill that passed in the House.

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Zuckerberg says Trump’s “shooting” tweet didn’t violate Facebook’s rules

Mark Zuckerberg at the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 15. Photo: Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Facebook did not remove President Trump's threat to send the National Guard to Minneapolis because company's policy on inciting violence allows discussion on state use of force, CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in a post on Friday.

The big picture: Zuckerberg's statement comes on the heels of leaked internal criticism from Facebook employees over how the company handled Trump's posts about the Minneapolis protests and his unsubstantiated claims on mail-in ballots — both of which Twitter has now responded to.

Updated 20 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 5,916,464— Total deaths: 364,357 — Total recoveries — 2,468,634Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 1,744,258 — Total deaths: 102,709 — Total recoveries: 406,446 — Total tested: 16,099,515Map.
  3. Public health: Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March —How the U.S. might distribute a vaccine.
  4. 2020: North Carolina asks RNC if convention will honor Trump's wish for no masks or social distancing.
  5. Business: Fed chair Powell says coronavirus is "great increaser" of income inequality.
  6. 1 sports thing: NCAA outlines plan to get athletes back to campus.

Trump says he spoke with George Floyd's family

President Trump in the Rose Garden on May 29. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Friday that he had spoken with the family of George Floyd, a black resident of Minneapolis who died after a police officer knelt on his neck on Monday.

Driving the news: Former Vice President Joe Biden said via livestream a few hours earlier that he, too, had spoken with Floyd's family. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee implored white Americans to consider systemic injustices against African Americans more broadly, Axios' Alexi McCammond reports.