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Protesters hold up signs calling for the release of detained Myanmar civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi in Yangoon. Photo: AFP via Getty Images

Myanmar's military leaders on Saturday suspended a law that limits security forces and ordered the arrests of prominent backers of the anti-coup protests taking place across the country, Reuters reports.

Driving the news: The move came as mass protests against the coup that ousted Aung San Suu Kyi’s elected civilian government entered their second week.

Details: Myanmar's army suspended three sections of laws “protecting the privacy and security of the citizens," which included a requirement for a court order to hold prisoners longer than 24 hours, per Reuters.

  • The laws also limited the ability of security forces to search or make arrests on private property.

Between the lines: "The announcements bore echoes of the near half-century of military rule before reforms began, when the Southeast Asian country was one of the world’s most repressive and isolated states," Reuters noted.

Myanmar's army on Saturday also announced arrest warrants for several prominent individuals who have been critical of the military on social media.

  • More than 350 political and state officials, activists and civil society members, including journalists and monks, have been arrested since Feb. 1 coup, the United Nations Human Rights Council said Friday.
  • "Several face criminal charges on dubious grounds. Most have received no form of due process and have not been permitted legal representation, family visitations or communication," the UN said.

The big picture: Several Western countries and the UN have condemned the coup and demanded the release of those detained, including Suu Kyi.

  • President Biden on Wednesday announced a series of steps in response to the coup, including withholding "$1 billion in Burmese government funds" held in the U.S. and imposing sanctions against the military leaders behind the coup.

Go deeper: Myanmar military broadens internet crackdown

Go deeper

Police officers' immunity from lawsuits is getting a fresh look

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Nearly a year after the death of George Floyd, advocates of changes in police practices are launching new moves to limit or eliminate legal liability protections for officers accused of excessive force.

Why it matters: Revising or eliminating qualified immunity — the shield police officers have now — could force officers accused of excessive force to personally face civil penalties in addition to their departments. But such a change could intensify a nationwide police officer shortage, critics say. 

The U.S. coronavirus vaccines aren't all the same

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The U.S. now has three COVID-19 vaccines, and public health officials are quick — and careful — to say there’s no bad option. But their effectiveness, manufacturing and distribution vary.

Why it matters: Any of the authorized vaccines are much better than no vaccine, especially for people at high risk of severe coronavirus infections. But their differences may fuel perceptions of inequity, and raise legitimate questions about the best way to use each one.

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2 hours ago - Economy & Business

The future of workplace benefits

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The pandemic exposed how workplaces across America are inhospitable to parents. But it could also spur companies to make changes.

The big picture: Well over a million parents have left their jobs due to child care responsibilities during the pandemic. Now, companies — large and small — are attempting to reimagine workplace benefits and add flexibility to help those parents come back.

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