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Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Bob Bauer, NYU law professor and former Obama White House counsel, told me this is the No. 1 thing he'll look for in the Mueller report:

His focus: Whether the extraordinary amount of time that former Trump White House counsel Don McGahn spent with the Mueller team — at least 30 hours — "included any attention to issues in addition to those of collusion and obstruction."

Matthew Miller, an MSNBC analyst and Obama Justice Department spokesman who has been one of the sharpest and most ubiquitous commentators on the investigation, told me he wants to know "how close the call was on obstruction, why Mueller didn't make it, and whether he explicitly left it to Congress."

  • "On collusion, I want to find out what it means that he didn't 'establish' that a criminal conspiracy took place. Was there evidence of collusion that didn't rise to a prosecutable crime? Huge question."
  • "Then there are a bunch of specific Qs: Did Trump know that [former national security adviser Mike] Flynn was going to discuss sanctions with the Russian ambassador in advance, and if he didn't, when did he find out?"
  • "Who directed the senior campaign official to get in touch with Roger Stone to find out what WikiLeaks was up to, and who was that senior campaign official?"
  • "How did WikiLeaks get the Podesta and DNC emails — was it a blind drop from the Russians, or was Assange working in concert with them?"

The White House speed read, per the N.Y. Times ... Aides "intend to all but skip the sections related to potential criminal conspiracy, and instead zoom in on two outstanding questions that Mr. Trump himself wants to ignore":

  1. Why Mueller "was not able to conclude whether Mr. Trump obstructed justice."
  2. What Barr "meant when he wrote in his letter that 'much' of the president’s conduct was public — meaning some of it was not."

Go deeper:

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Go deeper

Resurrecting Martin Luther King's office

King points to Selma, Alabama on a map at his Southern Christian Leadership Conference office in Atlanta in January 1965. Photo: Bettmann/Getty Contributor

Efforts to save the office where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned some of the most important moments of the civil rights movement are hitting roadblocks amid a political stalemate.

Why it matters: The U.S. Park Service needs to OK agreements so a developer restoring the historic Prince Hall Masonic Lodge in Atlanta — which once housed King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference — can tap into private funding and begin work.

Off the Rails

Episode 4: Trump turns on Barr

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Drew Angerer, Pool/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 4: Trump torches what is arguably the most consequential relationship in his Cabinet.

Attorney General Bill Barr stood behind a chair in the private dining room next to the Oval Office, looming over Donald Trump. The president sat at the head of the table. It was Dec. 1, nearly a month after the election, and Barr had some sharp advice to get off his chest. The president's theories about a stolen election, Barr told Trump, were "bullshit."

In photos: Protests outside fortified capitols draw only small groups

Armed members of the far-right extremist group the Boogaloo Bois near the Michigan Capitol Building in Lansing on Jan. 17. About 20 protesters showed up, AP notes. Photo: Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Small groups of protesters gathered outside fortified statehouses across the U.S. over the weekend ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The big picture: Some protests attracted armed members of far-right extremist groups but there were no reports of clashes, as had been feared. The National Guard and law enforcement outnumbered demonstrators, as security was heightened around the U.S. to avoid a repeat of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots, per AP.