Mar 24, 2019

The Mueller investigation's Russia report, by the numbers

Attorney General Bill Barr's letter to Congress today detailed the vast effort by special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in 2016.

By the numbers:

  • 19 lawyers
  • ~40 FBI agents, intelligence analysts, forensic accountants
  • 2,800+ subpoenas
  • Nearly 500 search warrants
  • 230+ orders for communications records
  • Nearly 50 orders authorizing use of pen registers
  • 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence
  • Interviewed ~500 witnesses

The bottom line: Barr says the investigation didn't establish collusion or conspiracy by the Trump campaign with Russia, and the report didn't weigh in on whether Trump obstructed justice.

Go deeper: Read the full letter highlighting the probe

Go deeper

Kenan Thompson and Hasan Minhaj to headline White House Correspondents' Dinner

Kenan Thompson on "SNL" in 2018. Photo: Rosalind O'Connor/NBC via Getty Images

Kenan Thompson, the longest-tenured "Saturday Night Live" cast member, will host the White House Correspondents' Association dinner on April 25.

And Hasan Minhaj — host of Netflix’s "Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj," and the entertainer at the 2017 dinner — will return as featured entertainer.

"Billions": Season 2020

Mike Bloomberg speaks at Hardywood Park Craft Brewery in Richmond, Va., on Saturday. Photo: James H. Wallace/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP

Money alone can’t buy a presidential election, but it surely gets you VIP access.

Why it matters: Billionaire Michael Bloomberg is duking it out with Billionaire Donald Trump, often on Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s Twitter and in ads on Billionaire Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook, all chronicled in Billionaire Jeff Bezos’ Washington Post. 

Biometrics invade banking and retail

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Banks have been quietly rolling out biometrics to identify customers — verifying them by their fingerprint, voice or eye scan — and retailers like Amazon are getting into the game.

Why it matters: These companies are amassing giant databases of our most personal information — including our gait, how we hold our cellphones, our typing patterns — that raise knotty questions about data security and privacy.