Mozilla announced Wednesday it's offering a virtual private network service for Windows and Android.

Why it matters: The move comes as the Firefox maker looks to expand its business, drawing on its reputation for security and privacy.

  • The service will cost $4.99 per month, with no long-term contract required.
  • It will initially be available in the U.S., Canada, the U.K., Singapore, Malaysia and New Zealand, with plans to expand to other countries this fall.

What they're saying: Mozilla said its VPN uses a more modern engine, making it faster than rivals' offerings, and also played up that it isn't looking to collect user data.

  • "We don't partner with third-party analytics platforms who want to build a profile of what you do online," Mozilla said, adding that it doesn't keep user data logs and sticks to its Data Privacy Principles.

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Pelosi, Schumer demand postmaster general reverse USPS cuts ahead of election

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer sent a letter to Postmaster General Louis DeJoy on Thursday calling for the recent Trump appointee to reverse operational changes to the U.S. Postal Service that "threaten the timely delivery of mail" ahead of the 2020 election.

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