Nov 4, 2019

The news we really read

Peter Luger Steakhouse. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Last week started with the Baghdadi raid and ended with the first formal vote on impeachment, with Lt. Col. Vindman's testimony in between.

  • But the week's most read New York Times article was restaurant critic Pete Wells' entertaining pan of the legendary Brooklyn steakhouse, "Peter Luger Used to Sizzle. Now It Sputters."
What gnaws at me every time I eat a Luger porterhouse is the realization that it’s just another steak, and far from the best New York has to offer. ...
Luger is not the city’s oldest, but it’s the one in which age, tradition, superb beef, blistering heat, an instinctive avoidance of anything fancy and an immensely attractive self-assurance came together to produce something that felt less like a restaurant than an affirmation of life, or at least life as it is lived in New York City. This sounds ridiculously grand. Years ago I thought it was true, though, and so did other people.
— Pete Wells, "Peter Luger Used to Sizzle. Now It Sputters."

Go deeper: Media's growing appetite for food content

Go deeper

Read Alexander Vindman's opening statement in the impeachment hearing

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman is testifying Tuesday in the House's impeachment inquiry.

Why it matters: Vindman is one of the first witnesses to testify publicly who directly listened in to President Trump's July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, which he will tell the House Intelligence Committee he found "improper."

Go deeperArrowNov 19, 2019

Vindman discusses his immigrant background in impeachment opening statement

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman discussed his family's decision to immigrate to the U.S. from Ukraine during his opening statement in Tuesday's impeachment hearing.

What he's saying: Vindman told his father that his testimony is "proof that [he] made the right decision 40 years ago to leave the Soviet Union ... in search of a better life for our family."

Go deeperArrowNov 19, 2019

Highlights from Alexander Vindman's and Jennifer Williams' impeachment testimonies

Photo: Shawn Thew/Pool/Getty Images

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, the National Security Council's top Ukraine expert, and Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Pence, testified Tuesday morning as the House kicked off its second week of impeachment hearings.

Why it matters: The hearing was the first time the public heard directly from witnesses who listened to the July 25 call between President Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky that lies at the heart of the impeachment inquiry.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Nov 19, 2019