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Clemson football players lead a "March for Change" protest past Tillman Hall on June 13. Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

In the past two days, 73 college football games were scrapped because of the virus, from marquee matchups like Oregon-Ohio State to storied rivalries like USC-Notre Dame. The Pac-12 joined the Big 10 in announcing they'll play only in-conference this fall, AP reports.

Why it matters: A conference-only schedule lets schools cut down on travel and other expenses at a time when athletic departments are facing massive budget constraints.

The big picture: All eyes are now on the ACC, SEC and Big 12 — the rest of the Power Five conferences— to see if more games will be shelved.

  • Hundreds of games have already been canceled, suspended or pushed to the spring semester at lower tiers of college football.

Between the lines: Most of the canceled football games in the Pac-12 and Big Ten are unglamorous matchups against small schools counting on big payouts to keep their athletic budgets afloat when they are already facing ugly bottom lines.

Go deeper: College sports stare down a coronavirus-driven disaster in the fall

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Go deeper

Sep 24, 2020 - Sports

Checking in on college hoops

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

No sport was impacted by the onset of COVID-19 more than college basketball, which saw the cancellation of March Madness. Now, we've come full circle, with details emerging about the upcoming campaign.

Where things stand: The season will begin a few weeks later than normal on Nov. 25, with the non-conference slate comprised mostly of multi-team events.

Updated 1 min ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates — Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day — Fauci says U.S. may not return to normal until 2022
  2. Politics: Top HHS spokesperson pitched coronavirus ad campaign as "helping the president" — Space Force's No. 2 general tests positive for coronavirus
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases — Europe faces "stronger and deadlier" wave France imposes lockdown Germany to close bars and restaurants for a month.
  4. Sports: Boston Marathon delayed MLB to investigate Dodgers player who joined celebration after positive COVID test.
Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Leon Black says he "made a terrible mistake" doing business with Jeffrey Epstein

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Rick Friedman/Corbis/Getty Images

Apollo Global Management CEO Leon Black on Thursday said during an earnings call that he made a "terrible mistake" by employing Jeffrey Epstein to work on personal financial and philanthropic services.

Why it matters: Apollo is one of the world's largest private equity firms, and already has lost at least one major client over Black's involvement with Epstein.